The (Possible) Future of Career Planning

careerthought

The Career Thought Leaders’ 2014 Global Career Brainstorming Day included career professionals from Canada, United States, and overseas. Their newly released 2014 Global Career Brainstorming Day White Paper covers trends in careers, resumes, job search, hiring, recruiting, and much more.

Here are 20 intriguing predictions from the report reproduced, with permission, from the Career Thought Leaders (CTL):

  1. Identity theft concerns drive elimination of home addresses on resumes. Some predict use of only email and phone number and relying on LinkedIn as a primary way to protect personal information.
  2. Companies that specialize in erasing digital history will become popular as professionals attempt to manage their online identifies and erase negative content.
  3. The one-page job proposal will replace (or augment) the resume. This unique document is projected to grow in popularity as a way to garner attention and gain competitive distinction.
  4. Increasingly sophisticated systems will screen people out more quickly. More career professionals will coach their clients on how to optimize their resumes for ATS and better use LinkedIn.
  5. YouTube will be the tool for Millennials in presenting their brand. 90-second videos with teasers may become popular as more students use emerging vlogging technology.
  6. There will be an increased need for career planning to be infused into the education system. Younger job seekers are frustrated because they were never taught to plan for a career or even to look for a job.
  7. New forums may emerge where workers identify skill sets and attract employers. This “reverse job fair” could prove to be a strong go-to-market strategy for professionals.
  8. Big recruitment boards may not be around much longer because more companies are using their own recruitment sites to manage applicants.
  9. Niche job boards will become more popular and offer a social media component. Finding and mobilizing these communities will benefit a person’s career.
  10. Employers will gather and evaluate data from multiple resources and use that information to create a professional’s “profile” instead of requesting a resume.
  11. There will be an increased use of Google+.  It is valuable in terms of raising a job seeker’s profile without requiring permission to connect, unlike LinkedIn or Facebook.
  12. Open courseware is the next thing. Learning programs will become more individualized and more widely available; there will be huge growth in self-paced online learning.
  13. Technology will create devices for measuring mental state. New devices will come to the market that will allow people to stay in a calm-connect-creativity state when networking and interviewing.
  14. Brain-based coaching and re-wiring the brain will be used in coaching to help job seekers make better decisions.
  15. Job seekers will be taught to be entrepreneurial and not to select a single career path. More people will have boutique careers and seek greater work-life balance.
  16. Employers will hire contractors who already have an exit strategy in place. They understand the employer’s immediate need and how to support it and then quickly move on.
  17. Instead of encore careers, retirees will instead think of creating a new identity or continuous evolution of career. Ageless aging and how we identify with age will evolve.
  18. Diversity will play a large role in personal branding. Resources and strategies will be needed to assist ex-convicts, the LGBTQ community, and persons with disabilities.
  19. The workplace will continue to become more diverse and multigenerational, causing employees to learn new strategies for collaboration and teamwork.
  20. Companies will expect employees to know how to job search. As a result, they will be less likely to spend five figures on outplacement.

Bonus Trend:

Job seekers will increasingly seek free services, in line with the trend of information that is widely and freely available online. Career professionals will need to learn how to be part of the online sharing community, while also setting boundaries and establishing the value of their (paid) services.

Top Interview Questions

lady-1038728-m“Be prepared” is a familiar motto.

It’s a good one to remember when going in for a job interview, not only to be able to wow them, but – more importantly – to help you clarify your own goals. A Career Counsellor is available at Career Link if you are unemployed or under-employed (working fewer than 20 hours per week), to further help you respond to questions like these below in a professional and honest way. Call us at 604.485.7958 or drop by Career Link (#103, 4511 Marine Ave. Powell River, BC) to set up an appointment.

Recently, the online jobs and career community Glassdoor sifted through tens of thousands of interview reviews to find the questions hiring managers most frequently ask.

The 50 top interview questions

  1. What are your strengths?
  2. What are your weaknesses?
  3. Why are you interested in working for [insert company name here]?
  4. Where do you see yourself in 5 years? 10 years?
  5. Why do you want to leave your current company?
  6. Why was there a gap in your employment between [insert date]and [insert date]?
  7. What can you offer us that someone else can not?
  8. What are three things your former manager would like you to improve on?
  9. Are you willing to relocate?
  10. Are you willing to travel?
  11. Tell me about an accomplishment you are most proud of.
  12. Tell me about a time you made a mistake.
  13. What is your dream job?
  14. How did you hear about this position?
  15. What would you look to accomplish in the first 30 days/60 days/90 days on the job?
  16. Discuss your resume.
  17. Tell me how you handled a difficult situation.
  18. Why should we hire you?
  19. Why are you looking for a new job?
  20. Would you work holidays/weekends?
  21. How would you deal with an angry or irate customer?
  22. What are your salary requirements? 
  23. Give a time when you went above and beyond the requirements for a project.
  24. Who are our competitors? (see over for more….)
  25. What was your biggest failure?
  26. What motivates you?
  27. What’s your availability?
  28. Who’s your mentor?
  29. Tell me about a time when you disagreed with your boss.
  30. How do you handle pressure?
  31. What is the name of our CEO?
  32. What are your career goals?
  33. What gets you up in the morning?
  34. What would your direct reports say about you?
  35. What were your bosses’ strengths/weaknesses?
  36. If I called your boss right now and asked him what is an area that you could improve on, what would he say?
  37. Are you a leader or a follower?
  38. What was the last book you read for fun?
  39. What are your co-worker pet peeves?
  40. What are your hobbies?
  41. What is your favorite website?
  42. What makes you uncomfortable?
  43. What are some of your leadership experiences?
  44. How would you fire someone?
  45. What do you like the most and least about working in this industry?
  46. Would you work 40+ hours a week?
  47. What questions haven’t I asked you?
  48. What questions do you have for me?
  49. What questions haven’t I asked you?
  50. What questions do you have for me?

 

Work BC’s Single Parent Employment Initiative: Starting Sept. 1, 2015

Single Parent Employment Initiative - Ministry of Social Development and Social Innovation, Province of British Columbia
Single Parent Employment Initiative – Ministry of Social Development and Social Innovation, Province of British Columbia

On March 12, 2015, the B.C. Government announced the Single Parent Employment Initiative.

Effective September 1, 2015, the following changes will be made to existing income assistance policy and employment programming to support single parents on income and disability assistance find and secure long-term sustainable employment.

  • Expansion to the current Employment Program of BC (EPBC) to allow single parents onassistanceto accessadditional services and supports throughWorkBC Employment Service Centres, such as paid work experience placements and up to 12 months of funded training.
    • If a single parent is assessed as needing training in order to gain employment in one of today’s in-demand occupations, they will be able to continue receiving income assistance for up to 12 months while participating in an approved training program.
  • Additional child care and transportation supports while participating in EPBC.
  • Once employed, single parents that are eligible for the child care subsidy will also have access to additional child care supports for up to one year.

Additionally, effective September 1, 2015, all families on assistance will receive an increased earnings exemption and have access to transitional health supplements for up to 12 months after leaving assistance for employment.

View the Government of B.C. news release for more information.

 Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Who is eligible?
  2. How does someone access the program?
  3. What will be covered?
  4. Is there a tuition cap if participating in training?
  5. What if someone is exempt from employment obligations?
  6. What service options will be available through WorkBC?
  7. If someone has prior training or a degree, will they still qualify for the program?
  8. What training programs will be offered?
  9. Can someone take the first year of a 4 year degree program then go to student financial assistance for years 2, 3, and 4?

The Government of B.C. will invest $24.5 million over five years to help single parents on income and disability assistance transition into the workforce with skills that align with today’s labour market.

Who is eligible?

Single parents on income or disability assistance are eligible to participate in the Single Parent Employment Initiative.

How does someone access the program?

Beginning September 1, 2015, single parents on income or disability assistance that are looking to re-attach to the labour force will receive more information from their caseworker on how to access services and supports through a WorkBC Employment Services Centre in their area.

What will be covered?

Based on individual need, participants will have access to a range of supports, including:

  • Paid work experience placements.
  • Tuition and education costs for approved training programs that last up to 12 months for in-demand jobs.
  • Additional child care and transportation supports while participating in EPBC.
  • Once employed, single parents that are eligible for the child care subsidy will also have access to additional child care supports for up to one year.

Participants will also be able to remain on income assistance for up to 12 months while attending training.

Additionally, effective September 1, 2015, all families on assistance will receive an increased earnings exemption and have access to transitional health supplements for up to 12 months after leaving assistance for employment.

Is there a tuition cap if participating in training?

There is a $7,500 tuition cap.

What if someone is exempt from employment obligations?

They will be able to take advantage of these new opportunities if they are looking to find sustainable employment; but, their assistance status will remain unchanged.

What service options will be available through WorkBC?

WorkBC will provide many paths to employment. Paid work experience and funded training are a few options. Single parents will work with employment counsellors at WorkBC Employment Services Centres like Career Link to help them determine the best route to finding a job.

If someone has prior training or a degree, will they still qualify for the program?

Participants will receive an individualized assessment through WorkBC. If someone already has skills for an in-demand job then WorkBC will focus on how to help them best apply these skills to the job market.

The intent is to enable single parents to gain long-term sustainable employment. BC 2022 Labour Market Outlook PDF provides an overview of jobs we expect to be in-demand in BC. While not every job listed in this report will be funded by this initiative, as some require more than 12 months training, it provides good context to understanding the labour market in BC.

If a single parent is assessed as needing training in order to find and secure employment, some examples of training programs that will be covered in the initiative may include: Early Childhood Education; Administrative Assistant; Medical Office Assistant; Special Education Assistant; and Welding Foundation.

Staff at WorkBC will work with single parents to assess their skills and their current needs and connect them with the necessary services and supports required to gain employment.

Can someone take the first year of a 4 year degree program then go to student financial assistance for years 2, 3, and 4?

The training focuses on programs that can be completed within 12 months. The goal is that at the end of the training the person would be job ready. Anyone who wants to take a longer program can access student financial aid. Staff at WorkBC would help them find the right program and the right funding source (including grants available to single parents).

GED Program Discontinued

gedBy Rob Hughes

Passing the GED (General Equivalency Diploma) test once gave those who did not complete high school the opportunity to earn their high school equivalency credential.  GED® certification is useful when it’s accepted by employers or post-secondary institutions as proof that you meet basic education requirements. 

The BC Ministry of Education discontinued the GED® program at the end of 2014 in favour of the Adult Graduation Program.  Those adults, 18 years or older, seeking to complete their high school must now complete 20 credits in the secondary system or five in the post-secondary system in order to receive their diploma.

The table under the heading At-a-Glance in the link below provides an overview of the qualifying courses.

http://www.learnnowbc.ca/services/adults/adultdogwood.aspx

The Ministry of Education provides information on their website

http://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/topic.page?id=9A33DD439E184672865E4DDF677F4002&title=Adult%20Graduation%20Diploma%20Program

Patricia McClelland at Vancouver Island University indicated that students can receive Planning 12 credit for previous certifications and work experience and 12A and/or B for previous work experience.  This often gives students their 3 grade 12 courses and leaves only the English and Math courses to complete for graduation. Any course taken can count for credit in the Adult Program. The number of courses given can go by hours – usually about 120 hours per 4 credit course – several mini courses can be combined for one grade 12 course if necessary.

____________________

 

See more information about the GED® Program here:

http://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/topic.page?id=AA7ED4837C9A4854B1E868DB829C39ED

Vancouver Island University

http://pr.viu.ca/

Powell River Board of Education

http://www.sd47.bc.ca/Contact/Pages/default.aspx

What can a career counsellor do for you?

professionals

by Melany Hallam

Water Cooler question for April 2015: I have used the services of a career counsellor to help plan my career or find a job.

  • Yes/No (take the survey now: )

Have you ever felt completely at sea when faced with having to find a new job or decide on a career path at school? Well, you’re far from alone in that feeling.

It’s very common to either fall into a line of work out of convenience or because you need immediate income to cover living expenses. But what if you could pick any job in the world—one that would make it exciting to get out of bed every morning—what job would you choose? Answering that question, and coming up with realistic ways of getting there, is what a career counsellor can help you with.

In fact, if they had a do-over, one in two Canadians surveyed would get advice from a counsellor when planning their careers or looking for a job. In a November 2014 survey commissioned by the Canadian Education and Research Institute for Counselling (CERIC), half of those with careers and jobs who did not seek career or employment counselling, regretted that they hadn’t obtained more professional advice (47% and 50% respectively).

The CERIC survey found that 55% of the 1,500 adults consulted had what they considered a “career,” while the rest either had a “job” (working for income rather than at something they really enjoyed) or were students. It’s interesting that more than half of the people with a career (53%) said they had received advice from a career counsellor, while only 38% of those with a job had worked with a counsellor.

“There is recognition that just like you need a financial planner and other professionals in your life, you also need professional advice to successfully manage your career,” says Jan Basso, chair of CERIC.

Think about that for a second. You spend roughly a third of your total waking hours at work. Why leave your career choice to chance and risk being unhappy for such a large portion of your life?

Why not take advantage of some advice from an experienced professional? It’s worth it in the long run, whether you’re trying to get ahead at work or changing jobs or if you’re a student or retiree. A counsellor can help you identify your interests and skills and figure out where you fit best in the job market. They can also help you find the education or training you need to get there.

But where do you find a career counsellor? The most commonly consulted are: high school guidance counsellors (55%), career counsellors at a post-secondary institution (40%), human-resources professionals at work (27%), specialists at a community-based employment centre (26%), or recruiters/headhunters (21%).

In general, the CERIC survey found that as people get older they work with counsellors less often. But it doesn’t have to be that way. For example, in Powell River, Career Link offers free career counselling services, including:

  • Career planning and job-search assistance
  • Resume feedback and help with writing resumes and cover letters
  • Referral to community resources
  • Assistance with training plans
  • Support for individuals with disabilities to plan career, training, and job search

The bottom line is that you don’t have do something as important as planning your career alone. So ask yourself right now, what’s stopping you from getting help?

————

More on the Canadian Education and Research Institute for Counselling (CERIC) career counsellor survey, http://www.ceric.ca/?q=en/node/1020.

Here are some things to think about and tools that can help prepare you for working with a career counsellor:

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