The (Possible) Future of Career Planning

careerthought

The Career Thought Leaders’ 2014 Global Career Brainstorming Day included career professionals from Canada, United States, and overseas. Their newly released 2014 Global Career Brainstorming Day White Paper covers trends in careers, resumes, job search, hiring, recruiting, and much more.

Here are 20 intriguing predictions from the report reproduced, with permission, from the Career Thought Leaders (CTL):

  1. Identity theft concerns drive elimination of home addresses on resumes. Some predict use of only email and phone number and relying on LinkedIn as a primary way to protect personal information.
  2. Companies that specialize in erasing digital history will become popular as professionals attempt to manage their online identifies and erase negative content.
  3. The one-page job proposal will replace (or augment) the resume. This unique document is projected to grow in popularity as a way to garner attention and gain competitive distinction.
  4. Increasingly sophisticated systems will screen people out more quickly. More career professionals will coach their clients on how to optimize their resumes for ATS and better use LinkedIn.
  5. YouTube will be the tool for Millennials in presenting their brand. 90-second videos with teasers may become popular as more students use emerging vlogging technology.
  6. There will be an increased need for career planning to be infused into the education system. Younger job seekers are frustrated because they were never taught to plan for a career or even to look for a job.
  7. New forums may emerge where workers identify skill sets and attract employers. This “reverse job fair” could prove to be a strong go-to-market strategy for professionals.
  8. Big recruitment boards may not be around much longer because more companies are using their own recruitment sites to manage applicants.
  9. Niche job boards will become more popular and offer a social media component. Finding and mobilizing these communities will benefit a person’s career.
  10. Employers will gather and evaluate data from multiple resources and use that information to create a professional’s “profile” instead of requesting a resume.
  11. There will be an increased use of Google+.  It is valuable in terms of raising a job seeker’s profile without requiring permission to connect, unlike LinkedIn or Facebook.
  12. Open courseware is the next thing. Learning programs will become more individualized and more widely available; there will be huge growth in self-paced online learning.
  13. Technology will create devices for measuring mental state. New devices will come to the market that will allow people to stay in a calm-connect-creativity state when networking and interviewing.
  14. Brain-based coaching and re-wiring the brain will be used in coaching to help job seekers make better decisions.
  15. Job seekers will be taught to be entrepreneurial and not to select a single career path. More people will have boutique careers and seek greater work-life balance.
  16. Employers will hire contractors who already have an exit strategy in place. They understand the employer’s immediate need and how to support it and then quickly move on.
  17. Instead of encore careers, retirees will instead think of creating a new identity or continuous evolution of career. Ageless aging and how we identify with age will evolve.
  18. Diversity will play a large role in personal branding. Resources and strategies will be needed to assist ex-convicts, the LGBTQ community, and persons with disabilities.
  19. The workplace will continue to become more diverse and multigenerational, causing employees to learn new strategies for collaboration and teamwork.
  20. Companies will expect employees to know how to job search. As a result, they will be less likely to spend five figures on outplacement.

Bonus Trend:

Job seekers will increasingly seek free services, in line with the trend of information that is widely and freely available online. Career professionals will need to learn how to be part of the online sharing community, while also setting boundaries and establishing the value of their (paid) services.

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