Water Cooler May 2016: The Millennial Generation; Changing the way we look at work

by Melany Hallam

millennialsCelebrating BC Youth Week (May 1-7, 2016)

Question: As a youth (or former youth!), do/did you have the opportunity to contribute to decisions affecting you at work?

Yes/No/Somewhat

When I started at my first real job, I worked for the paycheque. Every shift at the local library, I did what my boss told me to do and then I went home and didn’t think about work until my next shift. I was 16 and excited to be making my own money. It didn’t occur to me that I could have some kind of influence over what my work place or job description might look like. And I gave nary a thought to how my first venture into the work world would affect my future career.

Things have changed fairly drastically for young people starting out in the workplace these days. According to a recent study by University of North Carolina’s (UNC) Kenan-Flagler Business School, millennials are looking for careers with an opportunity for personal growth and “meaningful work” rather than higher pay. Millennials (also known as Generation Y) make up about 36% of the work force now and will comprise 46% by 2020, according to UNC study estimates, so employers take heed!

Here are some ways that today’s younger generation is looking to contribute to their workplaces and communities, as well as ways they are looking to benefit from their jobs:

  1. A real, valued role. They want to know that their work has an impact on the company that they work for, giving them a sense of purpose. This can also provide the employer with workers who are committed to the company’s vision.
  1. Service to the community. A study by the Pew Research Center in 2010 found that millennials feel it’s more important to help people in need (21%) than have a high-paying career (15%). And they want to be able to carry out some of that community service through their employer. If they participate in a fundraiser for the food bank or work on a community trail, being encouraged to do so by their company helps them feel good about that company.
  1. Encouragement and feedback. Millennials need real-time feedback rather than traditional performance reviews. This could be viewed as overly indulgent by some, but as a practical management tool, doesn’t it make more sense to use small nudges every day rather than attempt a huge about-face after six months or a year?
  1. Flexible schedule for work-life balance. The millennial generation is the first generation to grow up with the internet – they’re always plugged in and have never known anything else. Technology allows them to work from anywhere, so why be at the office for seemingly random set hours every day? Many millennials are perfectly willing to sacrifice some pay for more vacation time and the ability to telecommute. For employers, this is one of the most important factors to retaining millennial employees.
  1. Opportunities for development and advancement. The most important factor for 65% of millennials is personal development in their current job, according to the UNC study. They want to build their skills and make visible progress in their careers.
  1. Personal projects and entrepreneurship. Some larger companies like Google and 3M regularly have teams of employees work on anything they want as a special project. Encouraging initiative and creativity means more job satisfaction and engagement for millennial employees – and greater innovation for the company.

Yes, the work world it is a-changin’ and I’m looking forward to seeing the long-term results.

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Fun fact: The good news for Canadian millennials is that you’re doing better than the Americans! A 2015 TD Bank survey called “Canadian and US Millennials: One of These Is Not Like the Other” found that Canadians aged 25-34 are more likely to have jobs – nearly 80% are employed, compared to less than 75% of Americans.

 

 

Access Trade Training Programs

Selecting-a-Trades-Person-1

To work as a certified tradesperson, you need training combined with job experience.

Trades training usually takes from one to five years. Most apprenticeship programs take four years. The technical training takes place in a classroom or shop setting at a public institution such as a college or institute or at an approved private training institution.
To earn your “ticket” as a certified tradesperson in B.C., you must:

  • complete the required on-the-job hours and the in-school training
  • pass the examinations
  • earn the recommendation of your sponsoring employer.

Trades training in B.C. gets high marks from participants. In a 2014 survey of apprenticeship students, 96 percent said that the quality of instruction was good, very good or adequate.
Find out more about training for a career in trades.

  • Programs for Youth – Get a head start on your training. Check out Youth Programs that give you the chance to try out different trades while you’re still in high school.

From the Workbc.ca website

Upskilling Opportunities

001_RBI-image-1015305

up·skill
verb
gerund or present participle: upskilling
  1. teach (an employee) additional skills.
    “this is an opportunity to upskill staff and expand their capabilities”
    • (of an employee) learn additional skills.
      “they will provide grants of up to 75% for staff who decide to upskill”

 

Canada-B.C. Jobs Grant to provide $7 million for “upskilling”
by JOC DIGITAL MEDIA Apr 25, 2016

Read the FAQ

The governments of British Columbia and Canada announced on April 22 that $7 million will be available under the Canada-B.C. Job Grant to assist businesses in providing skills training to employees.
Canada-B.C. Jobs Grant to provide $7 million for “upskilling”.
Construction has been targeted as a ‘high priority’ industry, along with the technology and green economy sectors. Priority sectors will receive $5 million of the funding, with $1 million allocated for employers to train and hire under-represented individuals in the B.C. workforce, including Aboriginal people, those with disabilities, and youth. Organizations working with employers interested in hiring and training refugees will receive the remaining $1 million.

The Canada-B.C. Job Grant is a cost-sharing partnership between the federal and provincial governments as well as employers. The program is employer-driven, with governments providing two-thirds of the total training cost for an employee up to $10,000 per person to offset the cost of training, with the employer contributing one-third of the cost of training.

Information on eligibility criteria and application process is available on WorkBC’s website at: https://www.workbc.ca/canadabcjobgrant. Funding covers tuition and training fees, mandatory student fees, textbooks, software and other required training materials, and examination fees.

Employers will be able to apply for funding as of April 22 for skills training with start dates from April 22 to Sept. 30, 2016.

“Our economy is expected to lead the country in economic growth over the next two years. This funding will go a long way to help businesses provide their employees with the skills training they need so that we have the workforce to keep our economy diverse, strong and growing,” B.C. premier Christy Clark said.

A NEW guide for parents of teens who are planning their work future

parenrtsguide
Pick up your copy at Career Link or download a pdf copy at http://www.educationplanner.ca/_resources/WorkBC_ParentGuide.pdf

The Ministry of Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training and Ministry of Education have developed a guide for parents of teens who are planning their future in the labour market.

The WorkBC Parents’ Guide is being shipped out to WorkBC Employment Services Centre’s (ESCs) this week. It includes information on programs, strategies, services, labour market trends, and a range of resources to help parents support their child’s career planning.

The guide has been updated with new labour market information to support youth in exploring career and educational pathways. The guide is full of practical ideas and resources for investigating careers and making decisions and covers a range of vital topics including:

  • how you can help teens to find a direction and a passion
  • the labour market today and tomorrow
  • allies who can help you
  • essential skills and learning paths
  • how to finance post-secondary education and training

The guide, funded by the Ministries of Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training (JTST) and Education (EDUC), is a result of the collaboration of several ministries including JTST, EDUC, Advanced Education and Social Development and Social Innovation. Approximately 50,000 copies of the guide have been distributed to all WorkBC ESCs, First Nations training and employment centres, BC’s public, independent, and First Nations secondary schools, and public libraries.

Electronic copies of the Parents’ guide are now available at WorkBC.ca/Parent Guide, Workbc.ca/Parents ,the WorkBC.ca homepage and in a news release.

We encourage you to drop by Career Link and pick one up!

The Census is Coming

ccr16z_002_05-engClick on the image above for more information

Articles of interest regarding the census:

Starting May 2, 2016, Statistics Canada will send census letters and packages to all Canadian households.

You can complete your census questionnaire online or on paper.

Census of Agriculture

The next Census of Agriculture will take place in May 2016.

The Census of Agriculture collects information on every agricultural operation in Canada. Starting May 2, 2016, agricultural operators who intend to sell at least one agricultural product are required to complete a Census of Agriculture questionnaire.

The Census of Agriculture can be completed online or on paper.

My Census Reminder

Image of a yellow sticky note with the text: Your census, your neighbourhood, your future, To do today: Census, Other stuff

Sign up to receive an email reminder when it’s time to complete your census questionnaire.

Latest news: Collection begins in First Nations communities across Canada

Although the census begins in May 2016 across most of the country, census representatives will visit households in First Nations communities in April to complete census questionnaires with local residents. Census information is vital for planning services such as housing, employment, education, health care and other initiatives related to the well-being of residents in First Nations communities.

Census questionnaires will be completed by personal interview.

The census questions have been translated into 11 Aboriginal languages, allowing respondents to read them in their own language.

Census spotlight

Census jobs

Image of man and woman shaking hands.Join the census team and make a lasting contribution to Canada and its people. Apply now.

Census information in many languages

Image of books and a green apple.

View information about the census translated into 11 languages. Also view the census questions translated into 22 languages, including 11 Aboriginal languages.

Coastal Postings March 2016

Click above to view interactive version of chart
Click above to view interactive version of chart

 

 

Job postings in March 2016 = 134; 101 job postings through Career Link, and 33 job postings found elsewhere

Jobs offered in March 2016 (because some postings were for more than  1 person) = 177

Repostings: 50

 

Previous Job Postings (not positions)

  • March 2015 = 118 postings  (68 posted through Career Link and 50 found elsewhere)
  • March 2014 = 101 postings  (73 posted through Career Link  and 28 found elsewhere)

— we did not indicate non-Career Link jobs postings prior to 2014 —

  • March 2013 = 22 jobs postings
  • March 2012 = 43 job postings
  • March 2011 = 58 job postings
  • March 2010 = 45 job postings
  • March 2009 = 52 job postings

Volunteer your way into a job

by Melany Hallam

Question: Do you find your volunteer work more rewarding than your paid work? Yes/No/About the same/I don’t volunteer

I went to journalism school with someone who got hired at CBC radio in Ottawa just by showing up in the newsroom and working – every day – until the news director finally gave in and started paying her.

In not quite so dramatic a fashion, a friend of mine found work as a teacher in Vancouver after starting out as a volunteer at an adult education learning centre. My friend was working as a legal secretary at the time and wanted to do something more meaningful with her life. Her experience as a volunteer and as a part-time (paid) education assistant prompted her to go back to school to get her teaching certificate. She then got hired at the same learning centre as fully-qualified teacher – because they already knew her from her time as a volunteer.

There are lots of stories like these amongst people who volunteer. You may think that they’re just isolated incidents, but not so! In fact, a recent study from the Corporation for National and Community Service, a US government agency that promotes volunteerism, found that people who volunteered had a 27% better chance of finding a job than those who didn’t. The survey tracked 70,000 people between 2002 and 2012, so that’s a decent sample of participants.

How does volunteering help you find a job? There are lots of opinions on this if you take a quick look online. Here are five of the most significant work-related benefits of volunteering:

  1. Make new contacts. Sometimes it’s all about who you know. And what better way for potential employers to get to know you than by working for them for free? It shows initiative and it shows that you’re reliable – crucial qualities that many employers look for. (For more on personal qualities employers look for, see “How to Stand out in a Crowd”, a previous Water Cooler post.)
  1. Gain self-confidence. If you’ve been out of work for a while, you may be feeling pretty down about yourself. Working for a volunteer organization can make you feel like you’re making a difference in someone else’s life, that you’re a capable and valuable person.
  1. Learn new skills. If you’re looking to change careers or start a career, volunteering can be an excellent training experience. This is what happened with my friend who worked her way into a teaching position. She learned tutoring techniques from teachers at the learning centre, and found that she really enjoyed the work. The rest is history!
  1. Boost your résumé. Employers prefer to hire people who have current work experience. A volunteer position is just as résumé-worthy as a paid one, and can also provide you with great references (as long as you do a good job).
  1. Get a feel for a new work environment. If you’re an older worker who’s been out of the workforce for a while or if you’re a new Canadian, volunteering is a great way to find out what’s expected of employees in today’s workplace. If you’re looking for your first job, volunteering can also give you a reality check.

There are likely almost as many benefits to volunteering as there are volunteers, help with your job search being only one of these benefits.

April 10 to 16 is Volunteer Week in Canada and there are tons of ideas and resources on the Volunteer Canada website here. Here at home, a good place to start is the Volunteer Powell River postings list here. And, of course, your employment counsellors at Career Link can also help point you in the right direction.

Happy Volunteer Week, everyone!

volunteer
See local volunteer opportunities here

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More info:

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