Get Youth Working is Back!

Helping BC Youth improve existing skills and

gain new ones through practical experience and training.

Connecting BC Youth to employment opportunities.

 getYouthworking

The Program offers employers a $2,800 hiring incentive to hire eligible youth 15 to 29 years of age. Additionally, employers may request up to $1,000 to purchase training for the newly hired youth.

Tel: (250) 861-3100 TF: 1 (877) 866-3100

 Press Release:

Bowman Employment Services is pleased to announce that the Get Youth Working! Program has received NEW funding and is now available in specified regions of BC.

This Program, funded by the Government of Canada through the Canada-British Columbia Job Fund, offers employers in specified regions a $2,800 hiring incentive to hire eligible youth 15 to 29 years of age. Additionally, employers may request up to $1,000 to purchase training for the newly hired youth.

The Program is open employers and youth if they meet the following eligibility criteria:

EMPLOYER Criteria:
•    Eligible regions: Cariboo, Kootenay, North Coast and Nechako, Northeast, Thompson-Okanagan, and Vancouver Island / Coast
•    In business for a minimum of one year
•    In good standing with WorkSafeBC
•    Must employ new hire for a minimum of 3 months and 30 hours/week
•    Employers will not qualify if employee is hired prior to signing a Get Youth Working Funding Agreement

NEW HIRE Criteria:
•    Unemployed, 15 – 29 years of age
•    Has not applied for EI, not currently receiving and must not have received EI within the past 36 months; or 60 months for a parental claim
•    Not a full-time student or returning to school
•    Is a resident of BC and legally entitled to work in Canada
•    Not be participating in another Canada Job Fund program

Please find attached a Get Youth Working Program Flyer.  If you would like to order Rack Cards or Posters, please complete this  GYW Literature Order Form and we will send them to you at no charge!  Please visit www.getyouthworking.ca for more information.

 

Bowman Employment Services Inc.
Get Youth Working Program
Web: www.getyouthworking.ca
email: gyw@bowmanemployment.com
Tel: (250) 861-3100 TF: 1 (877) 866-3100

Water Cooler Survey: October is Healthy Workplace Month

carousel_2015_panel_home1_927x400cArticle by Melany Hallam

QUESTION: Does your worksite offer employees any health promotion programs, services, classes, or incentives?  Yes/No

What’s the first thing that comes to mind when you think of a healthy workplace program? Employee discounts at the local gym? Healthy snacks in the lunchroom vending machine?

Physical health is only one aspect of health in the workplace. There are many programs and means of accommodating employees who suffer an injury (on the job or off) or are diagnosed with heart disease, cancer, or any other equally debilitating physical illness. However, when it comes to mental illness, some workplaces may not even acknowledge that you have an illness at all.

What is mental illness, anyway? According to the Canadian Psychiatric Association, it can be defined as “significant clinical patterns of behaviour or emotions associated with some level of distress, suffering (pain, death), or impairment in one or more areas of functioning (school, work, social, and family interactions).” There is a long list of symptoms, which can be biological, psychological or behavioural, or a combination of these. Basically, it’s when a person can’t function normally due to trauma or their own biology.

Why isn’t mental illness taken as seriously as physical illness? Stigma accounts for a big part of the problem. People still often think that having a mental illness is a sign of weakness, and the best way to deal with it is to hide it. But this strategy comes at a huge cost. Here are some statistics from Partners for Mental Health, a Canadian non-profit group dedicated to promoting mental health in the workplace:

  • 44% of workers say they have or have had mental-health issues
  • 1 in 3 workplace disability claims are related to mental illness
  • mental illness now beats out heart disease as the fastest growing category of disability costs
  • 500,000 Canadians missed work this week due to mental-health issues
  • only 23% of those asked in a 2008 Canadian Medical Association survey would talk to their employer about their mental illness
  • $51 billion—the annual cost of mental illness in Canada

Some mental illnesses are chronic and some are relatively temporary. Diabetes is a chronic disease, as are some forms of depression. Sometimes, the reaction to a person who is depressed is that they should “pull themselves together” and “just get over it.” Ask yourself if this is how you would react to someone with diabetes.

There is much progress being made in terms of incorporating mental-health issues into healthy-workplace discussions, as even a quick online search will show. Like any disease, injury, or impairment, accommodating employees with these challenges can be well worth the effort. If faced with a choice, employers will almost always opt to keep existing employees because it’s cost-effective and less of a hassle in the long run than hiring and training new staff (see a related Water Cooler post here).

Mental health is just one more aspect of a healthy workplace, and I for one look forward to the day when it’s accepted as such.

———-

More reading and personal stories:

Winter Resort Jobs

02_burnie_glacier_chalet_tracks

It’s the first day of Autumn, and folks are starting to think about applying for winter resort jobs.


Here are some leads for ski resort jobs in BC

 

——————————————————————————————

Non-BC Options here: http://www.coolworks.com/ski-resort-jobs/

Alberta:

 

 

Site C Dam Work Available

This artist rendering shows the camp that will eventually house up to 2,200 workers on the Site C Dam construction project. (BC Hydro)
This artist rendering shows the camp that will eventually house up to 2,200 workers on the Site C Dam construction project. (BC Hydro)

Work camp will eventually house 2,200 construction workers

Link to this CBC news story: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/work-begins-on-massive-work-camp-for-site-c-dam-1.3227002

Work is about to begin in Northeastern B.C. on a massive work camp to house thousands of workers coming to build the Site C hydroelectric dam.

When it is completed, the camp on the northern bank of the Peace River will be a self-contained community, with its own sewage and water systems and facilities that rival nearby Fort St. John.

It is expected to house 1,800 workers when it opens early next year, with the ability to expand to eventually house 2,200 at the height of construction on the $9 billion dam.

At its peak, the camp is expected to bump up the population of the Fort St. John area by more than 10 per cent.

It will be so large it will have its own theatre, outdoor fields, indoor running track, a library and a spiritual centre.

BC Hydro spokesman David Conway said the aim is to attract and keep workers with quality amenities, including guest rooms featuring double beds, en suite bathrooms and wifi.

“The quality of worker accommodation is a key component of the project’s labour approach to attract and retain workers in what is expected to be a period of high demand for skilled workers,” he said.

ATCO subsidiary Two Rivers Lodging Group won the contract to build the work camp. But before construction of the camp begins, the contractor has to build its own smaller camp to house the workers who will build the larger camp.

When it is completed the Site C Dam will flood a valley 83 kilometres long, between Hudson’s Hope and Fort St. John.

It has been opposed by some environmentalists, farmers and First Nations.

With files from Betsy Trumpener

————————————————————————

From the Site C website: https://www.sitecproject.com/

The vast majority of hiring for the project will be done by the companies awarded contracts to build

Site C. Please apply directly to those companies awarded contracts to build the project, as BC Hydro will not be accepting resumes on behalf of companies on the project. However, BC Hydro will facilitate the hiring process by listing the successful companies and their contact information on this page of the website.

Update: BC Hydro job fairs was postponed to September 2015 (https://www.sitecproject.com/job­fairs­

postponed­to­september­2015) but no date has been provided for such a fair as of yet. We will update this page as this information is released.

Site C  Contractors

Public Road Improvements

(https://www.sitecproject.com/sites/default/files/fact­ sheet­public­road­improvements­july­2015_0.pdf)

The Public Road Improvements contract includes upgrading and paving 1.6 kilometres of

240 Road, 900 meters of 269

Road, and widening, paving and partially realigning 5.6 kilometres of Old Fort Road.

It also includes installation of street lights at various intersections along Old Fort Road and 240

Road.

Contract Award:

 A.L. Sims and Sons Ltd

 Email: hr@simsgroup.ca

 Web: www.alsims.ca

———————————————————————————-

Site Preparation – North Bank

(https://www.sitecproject.com/business­and­job­ opportunities/procurement­update/site­preparation­

The Site Preparation – North Bank contract includes building access roads,

excavation, and producing and stockpiling aggregate materials.

Contract Award:

Morgan Construction & Environmental Ltd.

Email: careers@mcel.ca

Web: www.mcel.ca

———————————————————————————-

South Bank Clearing

Clearing the south bank of the dam site includes the removal of trees and vegetation, constructing temporary access roads, upgrading and maintaining an existing road and other site preparation activities.

Contract Award:

Paul Paquette & Son’s Contracting

 Email: twpowell@paulpaquette.com

———————————————————————————-

Worker Accommodation

(https://www.sitecproject.com/business­and­job­ opportunities/procurement­update/worker­ accommodation)

The worker accommodation contract

includes the design, construction, partial financing, operation and

maintenance of a temporary work camp located on the north bank of the Peace River.

Preferred Proponent:

Two Rivers Lodging Group (ATCO Structures & Logistics Ltd. and Bird Design Build Construction Inc.)

 Email: tworivers@atcosl.com  Web: www.atcosl.com/en­ca/Careers

———————————————————————————-

General Contact 

Site C Clean Energy Project (/contact­us)

P.O. Box 2218

Vancouver, BC V6B 3W2

Toll­free: 1 877 217 0777

Fax: 604 695 5290

Email: sitec@bchydro.com (mailto:sit%65c@bc%68%79dro.%63o%6D)

Community Consultation Office, Fort St. John (/contact­us)

9948 100th Ave

Fort St. John, BC V1J 1Y5

Tel: 250 785 3420

Fax: 250 785 3570

Community Consultation Office, Hudson’s Hope (/contact­us)

The Pearkes Centre

10801 Dudley Drive

Hudson’s Hope, BC V0C 1V0

Occupations with training lasting up to 12 months (grouped by skill level and job openings)


Occupations with training under 12 months (grouped by skill level and job openings)
Data sources: 1. 2014 BC Median hourly wage rate is based on Job Bank data from ESDC;
2. Median employment income is based on the 2011 National Household Survey, for those with employment income
1
List of Top 100 Occupations in BC Occupation 2014
Retail salespersons
BC Median
Hourly Wage Rate
$12.00
Median Employment
Income in 2011
$14,602
Job Openings
32,700
Skill Level
C
2
Transport truck drivers
$23.00
$43,238
18,000
C
3
General Office Support Workers
$18.31
$27,051
14,600
C
4
Receptionists
$16.00
$22,812
13,200
C
5
Accounting and related clerks
$20.00
$34,801
7,800
C
6
Food and beverage servers
$11.00
$10,399
7,800
C
7
Security Guards and related security service occupations
$14.97
$23,960
7,700
C
8
Delivery and courier service drivers
$16.70
$24,487
4,300
C
9
Residential and commercial installers and servicers
$19.00
$27,691
3,100
C
10
Taxi and limousine drivers and chauffeurs
$19.77
$16,337
3,000
C
11
Travel counsellors
$16.73
$25,421
2,300
C
12
Mail, postal and related workers
$23.00
$38,544
2,200
C
13
Survey interviewers and statistical clerks
$23.36
$7,863
2,000
C
14
Data entry clerks
$17.50
$27,563
1,800
C
15
Dispatchers
$21.10
$9,604
1,600
C
16
Correspondence, publication and regulatory clerks
$24.07
$39,813
1,400
C
17
Hotel front desk clerks
$13.75
$22,514
1,400
C
18
Purchasing and inventory control workers
$20.00
$30,279
1,400
C
19
Bartenders
$12.00
$14,683
1,300
C
20
Administrative Assistants
$20.47
$32,234
17,600
B
21
Administrative Officers
$21.00
$39,325
17,500
B
22
Accounting technicians & bookkeepers
$19.00
$25,581
12,400
B
23
Social & community service workers
$19.00
$32,961
10,100
B
24
Property administrators
$20.00
$37,349
5,300
B
25
Heavy duty equipment mechanics
$31.00
$64,876
4,200
B
26
Chefs
$12.10
$27,905
4,000
B
27
Purchasing Agents & Officers
$25.00
$50,191
3,400
B
28
Program leaders and instructors in recreation, sport and fitness
$18.00
$9,712
3,300
B
29
Retail Sales Supervisors
$18.00
$27,587
3,200
B
30
Executive assistants
$26.30
$49,636
3,000
B
31
Legal Administrative Assistants
$23.25
$39,473
2,800
B
32
Other instructors (such as driver’s licence examiner and diving instructor)
$18.50
$9,275
2,000
B
33
Machinists and machining and tooling inspectors
$31.25
$54,746
1,900
B
34
Drafting technologists and technicians
$22.50
$44,074
1,800
B
35
Interior designers and interior decorators
$22.00
$25,354
1,800
B
36
Power engineers and power systems operators
$27.00
$72,541
1,700
B
37
Food service supervisors
$12.00
$18,472
1,700
B
38
Gas fitters
$27.24
$45,968
1,700
B
39
Underground production and development miners
$33.00
$68,169
1,700
B
40
Firefighters
$35.00
$80,681
1,700
B
41
Couriers, messengers and door-to-door distributors
$10.67
$9,604
1,700
B
42
Retail and wholesale buyers
$18.00
$25,964
1,700
B
43
Landscape and horticulture technicians and specialists
$18.00
$26,897
1,600
B
44
Artisans and craftspersons
$17.00
$11,159
1,500
B
45
Employment insurance, immigration, border services and revenue officers
$29.74
$55,978
1,400
B
46
Conference and event planners
$24.00
$31,465
1,100
B
47
College and other vocational instructors
$33.40
$48,099
6,900
A
48
Professional occupations in business management consulting
$28.85
$51,229
4,200
A
49
Computer programmers and interactive media developers
$33.65
$59,960
3,600
A
50
Social workers
$31.00
$49,857
3,300
A
51
Family, marriage and other related counsellors
$29.72
$42,094
2,900
A
52
Authors and writers
$27.87
$18,719
2,000
A
53
Health policy researchers, consultants and program officers
$32.00
$46,564
1,800
A
54
Natural and applied science policy researchers, consultants
and program officers
$36.00
$54,917
1,600
A
56
Heavy Equipment Operators (except crane)
$28.00
$50,188
8,000
C
57
Carpenters
$23.50
$29,995
15,100
B
58
Cooks
$12.10
$16,293
10,200
B
59
Electricians
$27.00
$42,884
7,400
B
60
Welders & related machine operators
$26.40
$47,050
6,200
B
61
Steamfitters, pipefitters & sprinkler system installers
$31.20
$55,191
4,900
B
62
Construction millwrights & industrial mechanics
$30.14
$64,427
4,800
B
63
Painters & decorators
$18.00
$19,977
4,400
B
64
Plumbers
$26.00
$38,574
3,700
B
65
Bakers
$12.50
$22,488
2,900
B
66
Plasterers, drywall installers and finishers & lathers
$24.00
$26,545
2,600
B
67
Industrial electricians
$36.00
$71,799
2,400
B
68
Concrete Finishers
$26.00
$38,751
2,300
B
69
Electrical and electronics engineering technologists and technicians
$28.00
$53,145
2,200
B
70
Crane operators
$31.00
$60,114
1,900
B
71
Roofers and shinglers
$20.00
$25,233
1,800
B
72
Sheet metal workers
$25.50
$42,875
1,700
B
73
Floor covering installers
$24.14
$22,310
1,600
B
74
Aircraft mechanics and aircraft inspectors
$31.00
$62,490
1,400
B
75
Glaziers
$21.00
$40,085
1,300
B
76
Ironworkers
$26.00
$43,223
1,200
B
77
Material handlers
$17.00
$30,250
7,600
C
78
Home child care providers
$10.50
$12,115
4,300
C
79
Early childhood educators & assistants
$16.00
$15,558
9,100
B
80
Air pilots, flight engineers and flying instructors
$31.25
$84,163
1,500
B
81
Professional occupations in advertising, marketing and public relations
$23.00
$41,085
3,400
A
82
Human resources professionals
$33.00
$58,919
2,600
A
83
Police Officers
$37.50
$88,296
3,400
B
84
Inspectors in public and environmental health and occupational health and safety
$32.86
$60,949
2,000
B
85
Construction inspectors
$36.00
$56,559
1,600
B
86
Petroleum, gas and chemical process operators
$33.00
$80,670
1,500
B
87
Paralegal and related occupations
$25.00
$48,480
1,400
B
88
Construction estimators
$31.25
$63,002
1,300
B
89
Financial auditors and accountants
$28.85
$52,687
13,500
A
90
Lawyers
N/A
$92,189
5,200
A
91
University professors and lecturers
$39.42
$78,403
4,800
A
92
Civil engineers
$35.00
$71,901
3,500
A
93
Business development officers, marketing researchers and counsultants
$25.00
$46,514
2,600
A
94
Electrical and electronics engineers
$40.00
$75,861
2,400
A
95
Mechanical engineers
$36.00
$69,677
2,400
A
96
Social policy researchers, consultants and program officers
$28.85
$51,109
1,500
A
97
Geoscientists and oceanographers
$34.62
$79,907
1,400
A
98
Post-secondary teaching and research assistants
$19.00
$10,247
1,400
A
99
Education policy researchers, consultants and program office
rs                       $30.22
$36,576
1,400
A
100
Biologists and related scientists
$33.65
$61,477
1,400
A
101
Architects
$31.73
$57,148
1,300
A
102
Employment counsellors
$23.00
$41,170
1,300
A
103
Web designers and developers
$21.63
$24,055
1,200
A
List of Top 100 Occupations in BC

Blade Runners Returns Oct. 13-Nov 9 (apply today!)

bladerunners

October 13th-Nov 9th

At Career Link

  • 4 weeks of workshops to help you get prepared to get to work
  • Work experience placements
  • Certificate training (First Aid, Foodsafe, WHMIS, Serving it Right, World Host and more!)
  • Help with getting a Driver’s Licence
  • Funding

Eligibility:

  • Youth ages 15-30
  • Unemployed or underemployed
  • Not a student
  • Not on EI in the past 3 years
  • Willing to work hard on yourself and try new things

Interested? Talk to the program co-ordinator, Nicole Townsend, at Career Link Nicole@careerlinkbc.com or 604-485-7958