Tree Planting in 2017

 

treeplanting-scenery-9

image source: http://hardcoretreeplanters.com/

B.C. spends $150M to plant millions of trees, create 3,000 rural jobs

PRINCE GEORGE, B.C. – British Columbia is spending $150 million to plant tens of millions of trees, which it says will help fight climate change and create over 3,000 jobs in rural parts of the province.

Premier Christy Clark says the funding will go to the Forest Enhancement Society of B.C.  (check out their faq‘s) to advance environmental stewardship and focus on reforestation initiatives throughout the province.

She says the new trees are one plank in the province’s plan to fight climate change and over the next 10 years her government will invest $800 million in B.C.’s forests and create 20,000 jobs.

Clark says her government will also seek innovative ideas to help it meet its climate goals, but the most basic solution is Mother Nature’s solution, which is sequestering carbon in forests.

The province’s Climate Action Plan drew criticism from environmentalists last year who said planting trees would not pay off for decades, as forests need to be mature in order to capture significant amounts of carbon.

The Forest Enhancement Society is an arms-length organization created by the B.C. government that supports projects that aim to mitigate wildfires and rehabilitate damaged or low value forests.

Clark says the province is also working to open up new markets for B.C. lumber in China and India, which she says will help insulate the province from events like a softwood lumber dispute with the U.S.

She says currently high value lumber goes to the U.S. and low value lumber goes to Asia, but she wants more valuable wood going to India and China as well as to increase the overall amount shipped to those countries.

For many more opportunities, please visit http://www.tree-planter.com/

Looking for a job planting trees? Work as a cook? A foreman or supervisor? You have come to the right place. These are some of the companies that are hiring and the “Corporate Bios” they have provided.

http://www.tree-planter.com/category/companies/

 

Coastal Postings November 2015

coastalpostsNov2015full
Click above to view interactive chart
  • Total # of positions offered in Powell River in November 2015: 97
  • Total # of job postings:  75 ( 48 via Career Link; 27 elsewhere)

 

# Of Positions by Sector

  • Accommodations: 2
  • Administration & Business Support: 2
  • Agriculture,Animals,Aquaculture: 4
  • Education: 2
  • Finance: 4
  • Food Services: 28
  • Forestry: 1 
  • Health Care: 9
  • Information/Culture: 4
  • Manufacturing: 1
  • Other Services (non-Gov’t): 3
  • Professional Services: 5
  • Public Administration: 2
  • Recreation & Sports: 2
  • Retail Trade: 17
  • Social Assistance: 2
  • Transportation: 3
  • Utilities: 2
  • Warehousing: 2
  • Waste Management/Remediation: 2

Site C Dam Work Available

This artist rendering shows the camp that will eventually house up to 2,200 workers on the Site C Dam construction project. (BC Hydro)
This artist rendering shows the camp that will eventually house up to 2,200 workers on the Site C Dam construction project. (BC Hydro)

Work camp will eventually house 2,200 construction workers

Link to this CBC news story: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/work-begins-on-massive-work-camp-for-site-c-dam-1.3227002

Work is about to begin in Northeastern B.C. on a massive work camp to house thousands of workers coming to build the Site C hydroelectric dam.

When it is completed, the camp on the northern bank of the Peace River will be a self-contained community, with its own sewage and water systems and facilities that rival nearby Fort St. John.

It is expected to house 1,800 workers when it opens early next year, with the ability to expand to eventually house 2,200 at the height of construction on the $9 billion dam.

At its peak, the camp is expected to bump up the population of the Fort St. John area by more than 10 per cent.

It will be so large it will have its own theatre, outdoor fields, indoor running track, a library and a spiritual centre.

BC Hydro spokesman David Conway said the aim is to attract and keep workers with quality amenities, including guest rooms featuring double beds, en suite bathrooms and wifi.

“The quality of worker accommodation is a key component of the project’s labour approach to attract and retain workers in what is expected to be a period of high demand for skilled workers,” he said.

ATCO subsidiary Two Rivers Lodging Group won the contract to build the work camp. But before construction of the camp begins, the contractor has to build its own smaller camp to house the workers who will build the larger camp.

When it is completed the Site C Dam will flood a valley 83 kilometres long, between Hudson’s Hope and Fort St. John.

It has been opposed by some environmentalists, farmers and First Nations.

With files from Betsy Trumpener

————————————————————————

From the Site C website: https://www.sitecproject.com/

The vast majority of hiring for the project will be done by the companies awarded contracts to build

Site C. Please apply directly to those companies awarded contracts to build the project, as BC Hydro will not be accepting resumes on behalf of companies on the project. However, BC Hydro will facilitate the hiring process by listing the successful companies and their contact information on this page of the website.

Update: BC Hydro job fairs was postponed to September 2015 (https://www.sitecproject.com/job­fairs­

postponed­to­september­2015) but no date has been provided for such a fair as of yet. We will update this page as this information is released.

Site C  Contractors

Public Road Improvements

(https://www.sitecproject.com/sites/default/files/fact­ sheet­public­road­improvements­july­2015_0.pdf)

The Public Road Improvements contract includes upgrading and paving 1.6 kilometres of

240 Road, 900 meters of 269

Road, and widening, paving and partially realigning 5.6 kilometres of Old Fort Road.

It also includes installation of street lights at various intersections along Old Fort Road and 240

Road.

Contract Award:

 A.L. Sims and Sons Ltd

 Email: hr@simsgroup.ca

 Web: www.alsims.ca

———————————————————————————-

Site Preparation – North Bank

(https://www.sitecproject.com/business­and­job­ opportunities/procurement­update/site­preparation­

The Site Preparation – North Bank contract includes building access roads,

excavation, and producing and stockpiling aggregate materials.

Contract Award:

Morgan Construction & Environmental Ltd.

Email: careers@mcel.ca

Web: www.mcel.ca

———————————————————————————-

South Bank Clearing

Clearing the south bank of the dam site includes the removal of trees and vegetation, constructing temporary access roads, upgrading and maintaining an existing road and other site preparation activities.

Contract Award:

Paul Paquette & Son’s Contracting

 Email: twpowell@paulpaquette.com

———————————————————————————-

Worker Accommodation

(https://www.sitecproject.com/business­and­job­ opportunities/procurement­update/worker­ accommodation)

The worker accommodation contract

includes the design, construction, partial financing, operation and

maintenance of a temporary work camp located on the north bank of the Peace River.

Preferred Proponent:

Two Rivers Lodging Group (ATCO Structures & Logistics Ltd. and Bird Design Build Construction Inc.)

 Email: tworivers@atcosl.com  Web: www.atcosl.com/en­ca/Careers

———————————————————————————-

General Contact 

Site C Clean Energy Project (/contact­us)

P.O. Box 2218

Vancouver, BC V6B 3W2

Toll­free: 1 877 217 0777

Fax: 604 695 5290

Email: sitec@bchydro.com (mailto:sit%65c@bc%68%79dro.%63o%6D)

Community Consultation Office, Fort St. John (/contact­us)

9948 100th Ave

Fort St. John, BC V1J 1Y5

Tel: 250 785 3420

Fax: 250 785 3570

Community Consultation Office, Hudson’s Hope (/contact­us)

The Pearkes Centre

10801 Dudley Drive

Hudson’s Hope, BC V0C 1V0

Researching Sea-Based Careers

Sea-Fair-Logo-2015-colour-transparent
Click on the image to view the Seafair website

With Seafair happening in town (July 24-26, 2015), we at Career Link figured we could review Sea-Based Careers for you. This is not an extensive list, but it is meant as a start. Drop by Career Link or call to set up an appointment with a Career Counsellor to determine the best course of action for you (call us at 604.485.7958 or visit #103, 4511 Marine Avenue, Powell River BC).

As in many other industries, maritime career paths are often highly varied according to one’s unique circumstances. However, some general guidelines can help you know what to expect and plan accordingly.

zodiac1

Basic Categories:

Shipping & Transportation

ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS MID-LEVEL POSITIONS HIGH-LEVEL POSITIONS
Ordinary Seaman Able Bodied Seaman Second Mate
Deckhand Junior Engineer Second Engineer
Utilityman Third Mate Chief Mate
Wiper Third Engineer Chief Engineer
Ship Fitter Engine Utilityman/Pumpman Chief Steward
Steward Assistant Electrician Chief Cook
Assistant Cook Chef Captain
  Research Assistant Master Mariner

COMMERCIAL FISHING CAREERS

ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS MID-LEVEL POSITIONS HIGH-LEVEL POSITIONS
Ordinary Seaman Able Bodied Seaman Second Mate
Deckhand Junior Engineer Second Engineer
Utilityman Third Mate Chief Mate
Wiper Third Engineer Chief Engineer
Ship Fitter Fisherman Chief Steward
Steward Assistant Engine Utilityman/Pumpman Chief Cook
Assistant Cook Electrician Captain
  Chef Master Mariner
  Research Assistant  

CRUISES AND FERRIES CAREERS

ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS MID-LEVEL POSITIONS HIGH-LEVEL POSITIONS
Ordinary Seaman Able Bodied Seaman Second Mate
Deckhand Junior Engineer Second Engineer
Utilityman Third Mate Chief Mate
Wiper Third Engineer Chief Engineer
Ship Fitter Hospitality Manager Chief Steward
Steward Assistant Photographer Chief Cook
Assistant Cook Engine Utilityman/Pumpman Captain
Waiter Electrician Master Mariner
Bartender Chef  
Housekeeper Research Assistant  
Entertainer    
Transportation Attendent    
Dining Room Attendent    

OFFSHORE OPERATIONS CAREERS

ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS MID-LEVEL POSITIONS HIGH-LEVEL POSITIONS
Ordinary Seaman Able Bodied Seaman Second Mate
Deckhand Junior Engineer Second Engineer
Utilityman Third Mate Chief Mate
Wiper Third Engineer Chief Engineer
Ship Fitter Engine Utilityman/Pumpman Chief Steward
Steward Assistant Electrician Chief Cook
Assistant Cook Chef Captain
Pipe Fitter and Steamfitter Research Assistant Master Mariner
Pipe layer   Commercial Diver

GOVERNMENT OPERATIONS CAREERS

ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS MID-LEVEL POSITIONS HIGH-LEVEL POSITIONS
Ordinary Seaman Able Bodied Seaman Second Mate
Deckhand Junior Engineer Second Engineer
Utilityman Third Mate Chief Mate
Wiper Third Engineer Chief Engineer
Ship Fitter Customs Officer Chief Steward
Steward Assistant Port Police Officer Chief Cook
Assistant Cook Rescue Service Captain
U.S. Navy Soldier Coast Guard Officer Master Mariner
U.S. Coast Guard Soldier Engine Utilityman/Pumpman  
  Electrician  
  Chef  
  Research Assistant  

SCIENCE AND RESEARCH CAREERS

ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS MID-LEVEL POSITIONS HIGH-LEVEL POSITIONS
Ordinary Seaman Able Bodied Seaman Second Mate
Deckhand Junior Engineer Second Engineer
Utilityman Third Mate Chief Mate
Wiper Third Engineer Chief Engineer
Ship Fitter Research Assistant Chief Steward
Steward Assistant Natural Sciences Manager Chief Cook
Assistant Cook Engine Utilityman/Pumpman Captain
  Electrician Master Mariner
  Chef Marine Biologist
  Research Assistant Ecologist
    Meteorologist
    Environmental Engineer

Summer job search: it’s not just about the money

By Melany Hallam

Monday, June 01, 2015

More than any other kind of employment, summer jobs are most often found through people you know. Think of it from the employer’s point of view for a minute. Why go through advertising a position, wading through resumes and interviewing applicants to find a person who is only going to be with your company for a few months? I sure wouldn’t want to do it.

As a university student, I found work through my dad. For three summers I worked in the smelter and the refinery at a nickel mine in northern Manitoba and made great money. I never had a student loan and I never had to resort to ramen noodles five times a week like some of my friends.

But you know what? I made a big mistake. When it came time to apply for real jobs after graduation, I found that working as a labourer in a mine wasn’t something I could put on my resume when looking for work as a journalist. Yes, I had the education but work experience, contacts, and a portfolio is what really gets you hired in that industry.

So how does this help your summer job search right now in Powell River? If all you do is keep your eyes and ears open for any kind of job related to your interests or your field of study, it may pay off big for you down the road. Why not give it a shot?

Here are five things you can do to find something that may help you with your long-term plans:

  1. Talk to everyone you know. And then ask them to talk to everyone they know. Otherwise known as networking, it really can get you where you want to go. Here’s an inspiring story from a young job seeker who found his dream job by going for coffee with 110 people (not all at the same time!)
  2. Quality not quantity. Sometimes it’s better to spend a lot of time on just a few applications to jobs that you really want. Stand out from the crowd by making sure you address your application to the right person, include keywords mentioned in the job description and tailor your resume to the job requirements. Career Link has many more resume and cover letter tips in our free workshops; see the schedule here.
  3. Clean up your image. Like any job search, seasonal or full-time, employers will look you up online. If there’s anything embarrassing or damaging out there, it’s better if you find it first and clean it up. You could start by looking yourself up here.
  4. Get creative when looking for jobs online. Don’t confine yourself to the usual job search sites.
  5. Try looking outside Powell River. There are also lots of traditional summer jobs in BC, such as fruit picking in theOkanagan, tree planting in Northern BC, and working as adeckhand in the fishing industry. If nothing else, some of these jobs might give you a better idea of what you don’t want to do as a career! Here are some websites to try: