Water Cooler: September 2016: Time for Trades

working-1229720by Melany Hallam

September 2016 Water Cooler Question: How many times have you changed careers? 0 / 1-3 / 4-7 / more than 7 Take the survey now. Click here

A lawyer friend of mine once gave me a birthday card showing a crazed-looking guy running around a room flapping his arms in order to activate motion sensor lighting. The caption inside read, “Another journalism major joins the workforce.” Har-di-har har.

Yes, I graduated with a journalism degree and, yes, it was difficult to find any kind of journalism-related work that didn’t involve being a mouth piece for a large corporation. But that was, shall we say, a significant number of years ago.

What’s the job market like now? I looked it up on the Google and found some very helpful information and advice for both job seekers and employers in the 10th Annual Talent Shortage Survey by ManpowerGroup (2015):

  • For the fourth consecutive year, Canadian employers have had the hardest time finding skilled trades people (plumbers, electricians, welders, heavy equipment service, etc); drivers and skilled business executives are also hard to come by, according to the survey
  • 32 per cent of Canadian employers report having difficulties filling some positions
  • The problem exists partially because of a shrinking working population (read “aging”) and, therefore, a shrinking talent pool

As well, according to this Maclean’s Magazine research, there is still a wide-spread belief in the myth that any type of university degree is the best way to a high paying career. But this belief may be severely limiting your options – and your earning potential. In fact, according to futurist Rohit Talwar, from 30 to 80 per cent of all jobs that exist today may disappear over the next 10 to 20 years, replaced by smart software, automation and robots. Kids in school now could have as many as 40 different jobs and 10 career changes in their lifetimes. That trend is starting now.

What does this mean for today’s job seeker? For those just entering the workforce, it may be time to widen your job search or training plans. For those with an established work history, it may be time to think about a career change to work that will always be in demand.

I’m talking about learning a trade.

Trades have had a bad rap for way too long. I can tell you that – after having gone through many years of helping to build our own house – wiring a 3-way light switch (never mind a whole house!), installing plumbing (planning for venting, pipe slope for drainage, etc.) or properly framing a room so that your drywall doesn’t get messed up is not easy. It takes mad spatial skills, math, patience and an incredibly logical brain. It’s hard, it’s sometimes crazy-making but it’s ultimately some of the most rewarding work you’ll ever do. I live in a house that is only here because I made it. How cool is that?

And as a beginning tradesperson, you can potentially get paid very decent wages after a fairly short training period. For example, my nephew is still in the apprenticeship stage of becoming an electrician. But his employer is paying him to complete his certifications AND is paying him more than the going apprentice level pay rate while he’s working. Why? Because Andrew is reliable, he’s a hard worker and he’s smart – all qualities highly-valued by his employer. Andrew takes his career choice seriously, he loves what he does and his employer is generous in showing his appreciation.

How many of us can say the same about our own careers?

More information:

 

 

Access Trade Training Programs

Selecting-a-Trades-Person-1

To work as a certified tradesperson, you need training combined with job experience.

Trades training usually takes from one to five years. Most apprenticeship programs take four years. The technical training takes place in a classroom or shop setting at a public institution such as a college or institute or at an approved private training institution.
To earn your “ticket” as a certified tradesperson in B.C., you must:

  • complete the required on-the-job hours and the in-school training
  • pass the examinations
  • earn the recommendation of your sponsoring employer.

Trades training in B.C. gets high marks from participants. In a 2014 survey of apprenticeship students, 96 percent said that the quality of instruction was good, very good or adequate.
Find out more about training for a career in trades.

  • Programs for Youth – Get a head start on your training. Check out Youth Programs that give you the chance to try out different trades while you’re still in high school.

From the Workbc.ca website

Upskilling Opportunities

001_RBI-image-1015305

up·skill
verb
gerund or present participle: upskilling
  1. teach (an employee) additional skills.
    “this is an opportunity to upskill staff and expand their capabilities”
    • (of an employee) learn additional skills.
      “they will provide grants of up to 75% for staff who decide to upskill”

 

Canada-B.C. Jobs Grant to provide $7 million for “upskilling”
by JOC DIGITAL MEDIA Apr 25, 2016

Read the FAQ

The governments of British Columbia and Canada announced on April 22 that $7 million will be available under the Canada-B.C. Job Grant to assist businesses in providing skills training to employees.
Canada-B.C. Jobs Grant to provide $7 million for “upskilling”.
Construction has been targeted as a ‘high priority’ industry, along with the technology and green economy sectors. Priority sectors will receive $5 million of the funding, with $1 million allocated for employers to train and hire under-represented individuals in the B.C. workforce, including Aboriginal people, those with disabilities, and youth. Organizations working with employers interested in hiring and training refugees will receive the remaining $1 million.

The Canada-B.C. Job Grant is a cost-sharing partnership between the federal and provincial governments as well as employers. The program is employer-driven, with governments providing two-thirds of the total training cost for an employee up to $10,000 per person to offset the cost of training, with the employer contributing one-third of the cost of training.

Information on eligibility criteria and application process is available on WorkBC’s website at: https://www.workbc.ca/canadabcjobgrant. Funding covers tuition and training fees, mandatory student fees, textbooks, software and other required training materials, and examination fees.

Employers will be able to apply for funding as of April 22 for skills training with start dates from April 22 to Sept. 30, 2016.

“Our economy is expected to lead the country in economic growth over the next two years. This funding will go a long way to help businesses provide their employees with the skills training they need so that we have the workforce to keep our economy diverse, strong and growing,” B.C. premier Christy Clark said.

Occupations with training lasting up to 12 months (grouped by skill level and job openings)


Occupations with training under 12 months (grouped by skill level and job openings)
Data sources: 1. 2014 BC Median hourly wage rate is based on Job Bank data from ESDC;
2. Median employment income is based on the 2011 National Household Survey, for those with employment income
1
List of Top 100 Occupations in BC Occupation 2014
Retail salespersons
BC Median
Hourly Wage Rate
$12.00
Median Employment
Income in 2011
$14,602
Job Openings
32,700
Skill Level
C
2
Transport truck drivers
$23.00
$43,238
18,000
C
3
General Office Support Workers
$18.31
$27,051
14,600
C
4
Receptionists
$16.00
$22,812
13,200
C
5
Accounting and related clerks
$20.00
$34,801
7,800
C
6
Food and beverage servers
$11.00
$10,399
7,800
C
7
Security Guards and related security service occupations
$14.97
$23,960
7,700
C
8
Delivery and courier service drivers
$16.70
$24,487
4,300
C
9
Residential and commercial installers and servicers
$19.00
$27,691
3,100
C
10
Taxi and limousine drivers and chauffeurs
$19.77
$16,337
3,000
C
11
Travel counsellors
$16.73
$25,421
2,300
C
12
Mail, postal and related workers
$23.00
$38,544
2,200
C
13
Survey interviewers and statistical clerks
$23.36
$7,863
2,000
C
14
Data entry clerks
$17.50
$27,563
1,800
C
15
Dispatchers
$21.10
$9,604
1,600
C
16
Correspondence, publication and regulatory clerks
$24.07
$39,813
1,400
C
17
Hotel front desk clerks
$13.75
$22,514
1,400
C
18
Purchasing and inventory control workers
$20.00
$30,279
1,400
C
19
Bartenders
$12.00
$14,683
1,300
C
20
Administrative Assistants
$20.47
$32,234
17,600
B
21
Administrative Officers
$21.00
$39,325
17,500
B
22
Accounting technicians & bookkeepers
$19.00
$25,581
12,400
B
23
Social & community service workers
$19.00
$32,961
10,100
B
24
Property administrators
$20.00
$37,349
5,300
B
25
Heavy duty equipment mechanics
$31.00
$64,876
4,200
B
26
Chefs
$12.10
$27,905
4,000
B
27
Purchasing Agents & Officers
$25.00
$50,191
3,400
B
28
Program leaders and instructors in recreation, sport and fitness
$18.00
$9,712
3,300
B
29
Retail Sales Supervisors
$18.00
$27,587
3,200
B
30
Executive assistants
$26.30
$49,636
3,000
B
31
Legal Administrative Assistants
$23.25
$39,473
2,800
B
32
Other instructors (such as driver’s licence examiner and diving instructor)
$18.50
$9,275
2,000
B
33
Machinists and machining and tooling inspectors
$31.25
$54,746
1,900
B
34
Drafting technologists and technicians
$22.50
$44,074
1,800
B
35
Interior designers and interior decorators
$22.00
$25,354
1,800
B
36
Power engineers and power systems operators
$27.00
$72,541
1,700
B
37
Food service supervisors
$12.00
$18,472
1,700
B
38
Gas fitters
$27.24
$45,968
1,700
B
39
Underground production and development miners
$33.00
$68,169
1,700
B
40
Firefighters
$35.00
$80,681
1,700
B
41
Couriers, messengers and door-to-door distributors
$10.67
$9,604
1,700
B
42
Retail and wholesale buyers
$18.00
$25,964
1,700
B
43
Landscape and horticulture technicians and specialists
$18.00
$26,897
1,600
B
44
Artisans and craftspersons
$17.00
$11,159
1,500
B
45
Employment insurance, immigration, border services and revenue officers
$29.74
$55,978
1,400
B
46
Conference and event planners
$24.00
$31,465
1,100
B
47
College and other vocational instructors
$33.40
$48,099
6,900
A
48
Professional occupations in business management consulting
$28.85
$51,229
4,200
A
49
Computer programmers and interactive media developers
$33.65
$59,960
3,600
A
50
Social workers
$31.00
$49,857
3,300
A
51
Family, marriage and other related counsellors
$29.72
$42,094
2,900
A
52
Authors and writers
$27.87
$18,719
2,000
A
53
Health policy researchers, consultants and program officers
$32.00
$46,564
1,800
A
54
Natural and applied science policy researchers, consultants
and program officers
$36.00
$54,917
1,600
A
56
Heavy Equipment Operators (except crane)
$28.00
$50,188
8,000
C
57
Carpenters
$23.50
$29,995
15,100
B
58
Cooks
$12.10
$16,293
10,200
B
59
Electricians
$27.00
$42,884
7,400
B
60
Welders & related machine operators
$26.40
$47,050
6,200
B
61
Steamfitters, pipefitters & sprinkler system installers
$31.20
$55,191
4,900
B
62
Construction millwrights & industrial mechanics
$30.14
$64,427
4,800
B
63
Painters & decorators
$18.00
$19,977
4,400
B
64
Plumbers
$26.00
$38,574
3,700
B
65
Bakers
$12.50
$22,488
2,900
B
66
Plasterers, drywall installers and finishers & lathers
$24.00
$26,545
2,600
B
67
Industrial electricians
$36.00
$71,799
2,400
B
68
Concrete Finishers
$26.00
$38,751
2,300
B
69
Electrical and electronics engineering technologists and technicians
$28.00
$53,145
2,200
B
70
Crane operators
$31.00
$60,114
1,900
B
71
Roofers and shinglers
$20.00
$25,233
1,800
B
72
Sheet metal workers
$25.50
$42,875
1,700
B
73
Floor covering installers
$24.14
$22,310
1,600
B
74
Aircraft mechanics and aircraft inspectors
$31.00
$62,490
1,400
B
75
Glaziers
$21.00
$40,085
1,300
B
76
Ironworkers
$26.00
$43,223
1,200
B
77
Material handlers
$17.00
$30,250
7,600
C
78
Home child care providers
$10.50
$12,115
4,300
C
79
Early childhood educators & assistants
$16.00
$15,558
9,100
B
80
Air pilots, flight engineers and flying instructors
$31.25
$84,163
1,500
B
81
Professional occupations in advertising, marketing and public relations
$23.00
$41,085
3,400
A
82
Human resources professionals
$33.00
$58,919
2,600
A
83
Police Officers
$37.50
$88,296
3,400
B
84
Inspectors in public and environmental health and occupational health and safety
$32.86
$60,949
2,000
B
85
Construction inspectors
$36.00
$56,559
1,600
B
86
Petroleum, gas and chemical process operators
$33.00
$80,670
1,500
B
87
Paralegal and related occupations
$25.00
$48,480
1,400
B
88
Construction estimators
$31.25
$63,002
1,300
B
89
Financial auditors and accountants
$28.85
$52,687
13,500
A
90
Lawyers
N/A
$92,189
5,200
A
91
University professors and lecturers
$39.42
$78,403
4,800
A
92
Civil engineers
$35.00
$71,901
3,500
A
93
Business development officers, marketing researchers and counsultants
$25.00
$46,514
2,600
A
94
Electrical and electronics engineers
$40.00
$75,861
2,400
A
95
Mechanical engineers
$36.00
$69,677
2,400
A
96
Social policy researchers, consultants and program officers
$28.85
$51,109
1,500
A
97
Geoscientists and oceanographers
$34.62
$79,907
1,400
A
98
Post-secondary teaching and research assistants
$19.00
$10,247
1,400
A
99
Education policy researchers, consultants and program office
rs                       $30.22
$36,576
1,400
A
100
Biologists and related scientists
$33.65
$61,477
1,400
A
101
Architects
$31.73
$57,148
1,300
A
102
Employment counsellors
$23.00
$41,170
1,300
A
103
Web designers and developers
$21.63
$24,055
1,200
A
List of Top 100 Occupations in BC

SINGLE PARENT EMPLOYMENT INITIATIVE

GD2168_SingleParents_Poster_Print (2)

The SINGLE  PARENT  EMPLOYMENT INITIATIVE can help you secure employment by providing opportunities such as up to 12 MONTHS OF FUNDED TRAINING for in-demand jobs or PAID WORK  EXPERIENCE PLACEMENTS.

In addition, CHILD-CARE COSTS  ARE COVERED during training and in the first year of employment.

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE VISIT:

WWW.SDSI.GOV.BC.CA/PROGRAMS/SPEI.HTML

or YOUR LOCAL WORKBC  CENTRE, Career Link (#103, 4511 Marine Ave. Powell River, BC

Open Mon-Fri. 8:30AM-4:30PM