Get the EDGE: PAID work experience in your field of studies

edge-of-programs-f
edge

Are you looking for PAID work experience in your field of studies?

EDGE ~ Career Focus For Youth provides funding for paid work experience opportunities for post-secondary students and graduates in high demand fields with employers who have less than 500 employees.

Advance your career by: 
• Gaining experience
• Developing your skill set
• Applying advanced knowledge in the workplace
• Developing your personal network and building relationships
• Transitioning smoothly from school to the workplace

You are ELIGIBLE if: 
• Between 15 and 30.
• A post-secondary student or graduate (college or university).
• Have studies in high demand occupational fields such as: Business, Tourism, Trades, Technology or Social Work.
• Legally entitled to work according to the relevant provincial legislation and regulations.
• A Canadian Citizen, Permanent Resident, or Refugee under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.
• NOT in receipt of Employment (EI) benefits

Enrollment is on-going. To pre-register and for more information, please call:
Peter at Career Link  604.485.7958 or email peter@careerlinkbc.com

Water Cooler for July: The 15th is World Youth Skills Day: Why does this matter?

worldyouthskillsday_0

By Melany Hallam

Question: If you had the option, would you train or change jobs to work in a trade? Yes/No/Maybe/I already work in a trade

Did you know that there’s a worldwide youth employment crisis?

According to the United Nations’ International Labour Organization (ILO), 74.5 million youth were unemployed in 2013, and 228 million youth were considered poor. Youth unemployment is greatest in developing countries but in first world countries such as Canada, younger workers under 25 years old are also:

  • often unemployed for at least six months of the year
  • taking jobs for which they’re way overqualified, and
  • increasingly working on temporary contracts or positions (not stable employment)

Why should you care?

The ILO is sounding the alarm now because they’ve found that members of the under 25 generation are worse off than the same age group 20 years ago—we’re going backwards! If this is affecting a whole generation, this can’t be anything but bad news for the world economy in general, right? See more on this in an interview with the UN Youth Envoy Ahmad Alhendawi here.

If you’re part of this younger generation, you likely won’t find any of this all that surprising. For example, taking a look at some of the numbers for Powell River, a School District 47 survey of Grade 12 students shows a fairly dramatic decrease in satisfaction that school is preparing them for work. In 2009/10, 54% of students were satisfied, plunging down to 26% satisfaction in 2013/14, according to Powell River’s 2015 Vital Signs Report. So not so optimistic, then.

To raise awareness of the youth unemployment crisis, last year the UN declared July 15th World Youth Skills Day. (Resources, videos, and handouts to help celebrate and motivate change are available here.) The ILO and its 187 member states (including Canada) are also recommending five policies to governments, including promoting:

  1. job creation policies
  2. job-related education and training
  3. help for disadvantaged youth
  4. entrepreneurship and self-employment
  5. labour rights and equal treatment for youth

What can we do locally?

In Powell River, one bright spot appears to be in trades training, where just under half of the enrolled students found local jobs in 2014. Programs are offered locally by SD47 and Vancouver Island University in welding, carpentry, automotive repair, culinary arts, and hairdressing.

If you’re under 29, you might also qualify to get help from provincial training and work experience programs—there’s a list on the BC Centre for Employment Excellence here.

Federal government programs for youth apprenticeships, careers, and education are listed here.

And, of course, Career Link is always here for you with help and advice.

Of the youth that I know personally in Powell River and the Lower Mainland, I wouldn’t say that most of them are all that pessimistic (or doing that badly employment-wise). But then those under 25’s that I know are not that large a sample! What’s been your experience? Leave a comment below—we’d like to hear from you.

Access Trade Training Programs

Selecting-a-Trades-Person-1

To work as a certified tradesperson, you need training combined with job experience.

Trades training usually takes from one to five years. Most apprenticeship programs take four years. The technical training takes place in a classroom or shop setting at a public institution such as a college or institute or at an approved private training institution.
To earn your “ticket” as a certified tradesperson in B.C., you must:

  • complete the required on-the-job hours and the in-school training
  • pass the examinations
  • earn the recommendation of your sponsoring employer.

Trades training in B.C. gets high marks from participants. In a 2014 survey of apprenticeship students, 96 percent said that the quality of instruction was good, very good or adequate.
Find out more about training for a career in trades.

  • Programs for Youth – Get a head start on your training. Check out Youth Programs that give you the chance to try out different trades while you’re still in high school.

From the Workbc.ca website

Occupations with training lasting up to 12 months (grouped by skill level and job openings)


Occupations with training under 12 months (grouped by skill level and job openings)
Data sources: 1. 2014 BC Median hourly wage rate is based on Job Bank data from ESDC;
2. Median employment income is based on the 2011 National Household Survey, for those with employment income
1
List of Top 100 Occupations in BC Occupation 2014
Retail salespersons
BC Median
Hourly Wage Rate
$12.00
Median Employment
Income in 2011
$14,602
Job Openings
32,700
Skill Level
C
2
Transport truck drivers
$23.00
$43,238
18,000
C
3
General Office Support Workers
$18.31
$27,051
14,600
C
4
Receptionists
$16.00
$22,812
13,200
C
5
Accounting and related clerks
$20.00
$34,801
7,800
C
6
Food and beverage servers
$11.00
$10,399
7,800
C
7
Security Guards and related security service occupations
$14.97
$23,960
7,700
C
8
Delivery and courier service drivers
$16.70
$24,487
4,300
C
9
Residential and commercial installers and servicers
$19.00
$27,691
3,100
C
10
Taxi and limousine drivers and chauffeurs
$19.77
$16,337
3,000
C
11
Travel counsellors
$16.73
$25,421
2,300
C
12
Mail, postal and related workers
$23.00
$38,544
2,200
C
13
Survey interviewers and statistical clerks
$23.36
$7,863
2,000
C
14
Data entry clerks
$17.50
$27,563
1,800
C
15
Dispatchers
$21.10
$9,604
1,600
C
16
Correspondence, publication and regulatory clerks
$24.07
$39,813
1,400
C
17
Hotel front desk clerks
$13.75
$22,514
1,400
C
18
Purchasing and inventory control workers
$20.00
$30,279
1,400
C
19
Bartenders
$12.00
$14,683
1,300
C
20
Administrative Assistants
$20.47
$32,234
17,600
B
21
Administrative Officers
$21.00
$39,325
17,500
B
22
Accounting technicians & bookkeepers
$19.00
$25,581
12,400
B
23
Social & community service workers
$19.00
$32,961
10,100
B
24
Property administrators
$20.00
$37,349
5,300
B
25
Heavy duty equipment mechanics
$31.00
$64,876
4,200
B
26
Chefs
$12.10
$27,905
4,000
B
27
Purchasing Agents & Officers
$25.00
$50,191
3,400
B
28
Program leaders and instructors in recreation, sport and fitness
$18.00
$9,712
3,300
B
29
Retail Sales Supervisors
$18.00
$27,587
3,200
B
30
Executive assistants
$26.30
$49,636
3,000
B
31
Legal Administrative Assistants
$23.25
$39,473
2,800
B
32
Other instructors (such as driver’s licence examiner and diving instructor)
$18.50
$9,275
2,000
B
33
Machinists and machining and tooling inspectors
$31.25
$54,746
1,900
B
34
Drafting technologists and technicians
$22.50
$44,074
1,800
B
35
Interior designers and interior decorators
$22.00
$25,354
1,800
B
36
Power engineers and power systems operators
$27.00
$72,541
1,700
B
37
Food service supervisors
$12.00
$18,472
1,700
B
38
Gas fitters
$27.24
$45,968
1,700
B
39
Underground production and development miners
$33.00
$68,169
1,700
B
40
Firefighters
$35.00
$80,681
1,700
B
41
Couriers, messengers and door-to-door distributors
$10.67
$9,604
1,700
B
42
Retail and wholesale buyers
$18.00
$25,964
1,700
B
43
Landscape and horticulture technicians and specialists
$18.00
$26,897
1,600
B
44
Artisans and craftspersons
$17.00
$11,159
1,500
B
45
Employment insurance, immigration, border services and revenue officers
$29.74
$55,978
1,400
B
46
Conference and event planners
$24.00
$31,465
1,100
B
47
College and other vocational instructors
$33.40
$48,099
6,900
A
48
Professional occupations in business management consulting
$28.85
$51,229
4,200
A
49
Computer programmers and interactive media developers
$33.65
$59,960
3,600
A
50
Social workers
$31.00
$49,857
3,300
A
51
Family, marriage and other related counsellors
$29.72
$42,094
2,900
A
52
Authors and writers
$27.87
$18,719
2,000
A
53
Health policy researchers, consultants and program officers
$32.00
$46,564
1,800
A
54
Natural and applied science policy researchers, consultants
and program officers
$36.00
$54,917
1,600
A
56
Heavy Equipment Operators (except crane)
$28.00
$50,188
8,000
C
57
Carpenters
$23.50
$29,995
15,100
B
58
Cooks
$12.10
$16,293
10,200
B
59
Electricians
$27.00
$42,884
7,400
B
60
Welders & related machine operators
$26.40
$47,050
6,200
B
61
Steamfitters, pipefitters & sprinkler system installers
$31.20
$55,191
4,900
B
62
Construction millwrights & industrial mechanics
$30.14
$64,427
4,800
B
63
Painters & decorators
$18.00
$19,977
4,400
B
64
Plumbers
$26.00
$38,574
3,700
B
65
Bakers
$12.50
$22,488
2,900
B
66
Plasterers, drywall installers and finishers & lathers
$24.00
$26,545
2,600
B
67
Industrial electricians
$36.00
$71,799
2,400
B
68
Concrete Finishers
$26.00
$38,751
2,300
B
69
Electrical and electronics engineering technologists and technicians
$28.00
$53,145
2,200
B
70
Crane operators
$31.00
$60,114
1,900
B
71
Roofers and shinglers
$20.00
$25,233
1,800
B
72
Sheet metal workers
$25.50
$42,875
1,700
B
73
Floor covering installers
$24.14
$22,310
1,600
B
74
Aircraft mechanics and aircraft inspectors
$31.00
$62,490
1,400
B
75
Glaziers
$21.00
$40,085
1,300
B
76
Ironworkers
$26.00
$43,223
1,200
B
77
Material handlers
$17.00
$30,250
7,600
C
78
Home child care providers
$10.50
$12,115
4,300
C
79
Early childhood educators & assistants
$16.00
$15,558
9,100
B
80
Air pilots, flight engineers and flying instructors
$31.25
$84,163
1,500
B
81
Professional occupations in advertising, marketing and public relations
$23.00
$41,085
3,400
A
82
Human resources professionals
$33.00
$58,919
2,600
A
83
Police Officers
$37.50
$88,296
3,400
B
84
Inspectors in public and environmental health and occupational health and safety
$32.86
$60,949
2,000
B
85
Construction inspectors
$36.00
$56,559
1,600
B
86
Petroleum, gas and chemical process operators
$33.00
$80,670
1,500
B
87
Paralegal and related occupations
$25.00
$48,480
1,400
B
88
Construction estimators
$31.25
$63,002
1,300
B
89
Financial auditors and accountants
$28.85
$52,687
13,500
A
90
Lawyers
N/A
$92,189
5,200
A
91
University professors and lecturers
$39.42
$78,403
4,800
A
92
Civil engineers
$35.00
$71,901
3,500
A
93
Business development officers, marketing researchers and counsultants
$25.00
$46,514
2,600
A
94
Electrical and electronics engineers
$40.00
$75,861
2,400
A
95
Mechanical engineers
$36.00
$69,677
2,400
A
96
Social policy researchers, consultants and program officers
$28.85
$51,109
1,500
A
97
Geoscientists and oceanographers
$34.62
$79,907
1,400
A
98
Post-secondary teaching and research assistants
$19.00
$10,247
1,400
A
99
Education policy researchers, consultants and program office
rs                       $30.22
$36,576
1,400
A
100
Biologists and related scientists
$33.65
$61,477
1,400
A
101
Architects
$31.73
$57,148
1,300
A
102
Employment counsellors
$23.00
$41,170
1,300
A
103
Web designers and developers
$21.63
$24,055
1,200
A
List of Top 100 Occupations in BC

Tools for B.C.’s Skills for Jobs Blueprint

jobsblueprint

4 online tools delivered by B.C.’s Skills for Jobs Blueprint

1. Blueprint Builder – more than 14,000 British Columbians have registered an account. This tools brings together more than 40 government tools and resources. Track progress on your career exploration, education and training and job searches.

2. WorkBC’s Job Search toolsearch thousands of open jobs in B.C. by job title, employer name, keywords or your city.

3. Apprentice Job Match toolmatchmaking tool for apprentices and B.C. trades employers.

4. Trades Training Seat Finder find open trades training seats in B.C. by searching tracking open seats at post-secondary institutions or trades program.

To learn more about B.C.’s Skills for Jobs Blueprint and how it can help you just click (or touch): www.workbc.ca/blueprintaction

 

What’s up at VIU Fall 2014


malLogoAs we prepare to run off to summer jobs or holidays, it’s a great time to set down some education and training plans for September!

This week we offer a peek at what is on offer at Vancouver Island University (VIU)’s Powell River Campus. As we are simply compiling and relaying this information, it’s best to check with VIU staff for any specifics and for updates at 604.485.2878 or check their website at http://www.pr.viu.ca/

Dual Credit

Some program seats are reserved for qualifying high school students which allows them to obtain their high school graduation while concurrently earning a Vancouver Island University Certificate or Vancouver Island University Credits.

The following programs/courses are available for Dual Credit:
Trades Programs

  • Automotive Service Technician – Foundation Level 1
  • Culinary Arts – Apprenticeship Level 1
  • Carpentry – Foundation Level 1
  • Hairdressing
  • Welding – Foundation

For more information please contact Jim Palm, Career Education Coordinator, Brooks Secondary School at 604-483-3171 or an advisor at Vancouver Island University at 604-485-2878.


Short-Term Certification Options

 VIU_OnCampusFall2014

English Academic Skills Experience (EASE)
Campus and Community English Immersion Program
Sustainable Leisure Management MA Program Preparation View brochure

Funding Opportunities

The following are links for Apprenticeship grants and tax credits

See http://www.itabc.ca/grants-tax-credits/grants. $1000 Apprenticeship Incentive Grants (AIGs) are available for first two years of Red Seal apprenticeships.

See list of AIG requirements here.

After that, tax credits are available. Tax credits are also available for non-Red-Seal apprenticeship programs.

Bladerunners is back!

Bladerunners20LogoWhat is Bladerunners?
Bladerunners is one of the most successful youth employment programs in BC. It helps participants with multiple barriers to employment to successfully transition into the workplace. By providing essential certifications and personal guidance, Bladerunners helps to ensure participants have what it takes to get hired.
This session of Bladerunners is geared towards preparing participants for jobs in the service industry. Eligible youth who wish to become employed this summer are strongly encouraged to apply.

What will Bladerunners receive?
● 4 weeks of classroom-based learning focusing on professional development, skills enhancement, and personal growth.
● WHMIS, Food Safe, World Host, Serving it Right, First Aid (OFA L1) and other workshops and training.
● Possibility of other certifications or necessary pieces of identification as needed.
● Training stipend of $100/week for attendance.
● Employment bonus of $100 upon attaining employment.
● Work clothes to help support the cost of entering the workplace.
● Possibility of participating in additional work experience.
Who is Eligible?
Unemployed or underemployed youth ages 15-30 who are not students and have not received Employment Insurance in the past 3 years are eligible for Bladerunners.
Good candidates for Bladerunners include youth with some of the following barriers and criteria:

  • Lack of experience or education (eg. Non-completion of High School, limited work experience or training)
  • At risk factors (eg. History of substance abuse, single parent issues, contact with justice,
  • homeless or at risk of homelessness)
  • Aboriginal ancestry

Details
● The program runs for 4 weeks, Monday June 16th to Friday July 11th
● Sessions will be held at Career Link #103, 4511 Marine Avenue, Powell River V8A 2K5
● To discuss becoming a Bladerunner, please contact Nicole Townsend at nicole@careerlinkbc.com or call Career Link at 604 485-7958.

Seaspan set to hire new tradespeople by Fall 2014

Seaspan
Seaspan

There couldn’t be a better time to pursue a career in BC’s burgeoning shipbuilding sector. Annual revenues in the BC shipbuilding and repair industry are projected to climb from an average of $265 million (2004-2010) to more than $1.4 billion by 2018, according to BCShippingNews

At least 2,000 new direct jobs and 2,500 indirect jobs are expected to be created by 2020.

Seaspan Marine is gearing up for a significant increase in trades positions. The exciting news came in 2011, when Seaspan Vancouver Shipyards was selected to build four noncombat ships for Canada: offshore fishery science vessel, offshore oceanographic science vessel, joint support ship, and polar ice breaker. In 2013, the government announced two additional Seaspan projects: offshore patrol vessels (OPVs) and medium endurance multi-task vessels (MEMTVs).

“Since the 2011 announcement we have been working with the government on the design for the fishery science vessel and investing in our facilities in North Vancouver and Victoria, building new facilities, buying equipment, putting in place new processes and building the team,” says John Shaw, VP Government Relations and Business Development at Seaspan.

Shaw says Seaspan has hired all senior management and technical staff. The company is currently hiring engineers and production managers—“those people that have experience in building ships”—and in eight months will begin filling trades positions.

“We will be completing the design for the fishery vessel this year and are looking at starting construction in the fourth quarter. We’ll have the first uptake in trades work in October,” Shaw says. “Over the year, we expect, with the building of the offshore fishery science vessel, that our production workforce would grow to between 250 and 350 people.”

That means hiring about 50 to 100 new tradespeople in the last quarter of 2014.

Production of the joint support ship is expected to start in late 2016. “And for that, we would see a ramp-up in the production workforce in late 2016 and into 2017 of up to 1,000 tradespeople.”

Shipbuilding trades include the following:

  • Electrician
  • Joiner
  • Machinist
  • Metal Fabrication
  • Painter
  • Sheet Metal
  • Steamfitter
  • Welder

All trades positions are filled through the respective unions. Anyone interested in becoming qualified to fill a trades position should contact the union for information and requirements.

Here are some links to Trade Unions to get you started:

  • Marine & Shipbuilders Local 506 – representing Painters/Sandblasters, Welders, Shipfitters, Metal Fabricators, Crane Operators , Riggers, Joiners and General Labour. http://marineandshipbuilderslocal506.ca/
  • International Association of Machinists Lodge 692 – representing Mechanics (Engine Fitters), Machinists http://www.ibew213.org/
  • United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters, Local 170 – representing Pipefitters http://www.uacanada.ca/
  • International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers – IBEW Local 213 representing Electricians http://www.ibew213.org/
  • Marine Workers & Boilermakers Industrial Union – Local 1 representing Welders, Shipfitters, Painters/Sandblasters, General Labour http://www.marineworkers.ca

High-school students who are interested in trade certification will need to enter an apprenticeship program and should contact the union for information. Some trades require completion of a certificate program before becoming an apprentice. For example, Steamfitters have to complete the Pipefitter Foundations Certificate at an accredited learning institution prior to the apprenticeship. Apprenticeships are generally four or five years, depending on the trade.

Shaw says it is also possible to do an apprenticeship through Seaspan. “It’s something we are currently doing, but the volume will pick up as we move into 2015 and 2016.”

He notes that Seaspan apprentices still have to go through the unions for hiring. “We can train tradespeople, but they then go on to the union seniority list and then we hire through the unions.”

For information on apprenticeships, click here: http://www.seaspan.com/career-path-apprenticeship/

Shaw has this advice for high-school students thinking about a trades career: “First, talk to your high-school counsellor. The high-school counsellor should have information on trades training and the process necessary to do that.”

Here are some links to help you get started on your career

Accredited Learning Institutions provide the classroom courses and training segment of apprenticeship programs. See what’s involved in the classroom side of apprenticeship by following the links to the trade for program schedules, course outline, hours and schedules. Enrolment is subject to acceptance into an apprentice program.