Occupations with training lasting up to 12 months (grouped by skill level and job openings)


Occupations with training under 12 months (grouped by skill level and job openings)
Data sources: 1. 2014 BC Median hourly wage rate is based on Job Bank data from ESDC;
2. Median employment income is based on the 2011 National Household Survey, for those with employment income
1
List of Top 100 Occupations in BC Occupation 2014
Retail salespersons
BC Median
Hourly Wage Rate
$12.00
Median Employment
Income in 2011
$14,602
Job Openings
32,700
Skill Level
C
2
Transport truck drivers
$23.00
$43,238
18,000
C
3
General Office Support Workers
$18.31
$27,051
14,600
C
4
Receptionists
$16.00
$22,812
13,200
C
5
Accounting and related clerks
$20.00
$34,801
7,800
C
6
Food and beverage servers
$11.00
$10,399
7,800
C
7
Security Guards and related security service occupations
$14.97
$23,960
7,700
C
8
Delivery and courier service drivers
$16.70
$24,487
4,300
C
9
Residential and commercial installers and servicers
$19.00
$27,691
3,100
C
10
Taxi and limousine drivers and chauffeurs
$19.77
$16,337
3,000
C
11
Travel counsellors
$16.73
$25,421
2,300
C
12
Mail, postal and related workers
$23.00
$38,544
2,200
C
13
Survey interviewers and statistical clerks
$23.36
$7,863
2,000
C
14
Data entry clerks
$17.50
$27,563
1,800
C
15
Dispatchers
$21.10
$9,604
1,600
C
16
Correspondence, publication and regulatory clerks
$24.07
$39,813
1,400
C
17
Hotel front desk clerks
$13.75
$22,514
1,400
C
18
Purchasing and inventory control workers
$20.00
$30,279
1,400
C
19
Bartenders
$12.00
$14,683
1,300
C
20
Administrative Assistants
$20.47
$32,234
17,600
B
21
Administrative Officers
$21.00
$39,325
17,500
B
22
Accounting technicians & bookkeepers
$19.00
$25,581
12,400
B
23
Social & community service workers
$19.00
$32,961
10,100
B
24
Property administrators
$20.00
$37,349
5,300
B
25
Heavy duty equipment mechanics
$31.00
$64,876
4,200
B
26
Chefs
$12.10
$27,905
4,000
B
27
Purchasing Agents & Officers
$25.00
$50,191
3,400
B
28
Program leaders and instructors in recreation, sport and fitness
$18.00
$9,712
3,300
B
29
Retail Sales Supervisors
$18.00
$27,587
3,200
B
30
Executive assistants
$26.30
$49,636
3,000
B
31
Legal Administrative Assistants
$23.25
$39,473
2,800
B
32
Other instructors (such as driver’s licence examiner and diving instructor)
$18.50
$9,275
2,000
B
33
Machinists and machining and tooling inspectors
$31.25
$54,746
1,900
B
34
Drafting technologists and technicians
$22.50
$44,074
1,800
B
35
Interior designers and interior decorators
$22.00
$25,354
1,800
B
36
Power engineers and power systems operators
$27.00
$72,541
1,700
B
37
Food service supervisors
$12.00
$18,472
1,700
B
38
Gas fitters
$27.24
$45,968
1,700
B
39
Underground production and development miners
$33.00
$68,169
1,700
B
40
Firefighters
$35.00
$80,681
1,700
B
41
Couriers, messengers and door-to-door distributors
$10.67
$9,604
1,700
B
42
Retail and wholesale buyers
$18.00
$25,964
1,700
B
43
Landscape and horticulture technicians and specialists
$18.00
$26,897
1,600
B
44
Artisans and craftspersons
$17.00
$11,159
1,500
B
45
Employment insurance, immigration, border services and revenue officers
$29.74
$55,978
1,400
B
46
Conference and event planners
$24.00
$31,465
1,100
B
47
College and other vocational instructors
$33.40
$48,099
6,900
A
48
Professional occupations in business management consulting
$28.85
$51,229
4,200
A
49
Computer programmers and interactive media developers
$33.65
$59,960
3,600
A
50
Social workers
$31.00
$49,857
3,300
A
51
Family, marriage and other related counsellors
$29.72
$42,094
2,900
A
52
Authors and writers
$27.87
$18,719
2,000
A
53
Health policy researchers, consultants and program officers
$32.00
$46,564
1,800
A
54
Natural and applied science policy researchers, consultants
and program officers
$36.00
$54,917
1,600
A
56
Heavy Equipment Operators (except crane)
$28.00
$50,188
8,000
C
57
Carpenters
$23.50
$29,995
15,100
B
58
Cooks
$12.10
$16,293
10,200
B
59
Electricians
$27.00
$42,884
7,400
B
60
Welders & related machine operators
$26.40
$47,050
6,200
B
61
Steamfitters, pipefitters & sprinkler system installers
$31.20
$55,191
4,900
B
62
Construction millwrights & industrial mechanics
$30.14
$64,427
4,800
B
63
Painters & decorators
$18.00
$19,977
4,400
B
64
Plumbers
$26.00
$38,574
3,700
B
65
Bakers
$12.50
$22,488
2,900
B
66
Plasterers, drywall installers and finishers & lathers
$24.00
$26,545
2,600
B
67
Industrial electricians
$36.00
$71,799
2,400
B
68
Concrete Finishers
$26.00
$38,751
2,300
B
69
Electrical and electronics engineering technologists and technicians
$28.00
$53,145
2,200
B
70
Crane operators
$31.00
$60,114
1,900
B
71
Roofers and shinglers
$20.00
$25,233
1,800
B
72
Sheet metal workers
$25.50
$42,875
1,700
B
73
Floor covering installers
$24.14
$22,310
1,600
B
74
Aircraft mechanics and aircraft inspectors
$31.00
$62,490
1,400
B
75
Glaziers
$21.00
$40,085
1,300
B
76
Ironworkers
$26.00
$43,223
1,200
B
77
Material handlers
$17.00
$30,250
7,600
C
78
Home child care providers
$10.50
$12,115
4,300
C
79
Early childhood educators & assistants
$16.00
$15,558
9,100
B
80
Air pilots, flight engineers and flying instructors
$31.25
$84,163
1,500
B
81
Professional occupations in advertising, marketing and public relations
$23.00
$41,085
3,400
A
82
Human resources professionals
$33.00
$58,919
2,600
A
83
Police Officers
$37.50
$88,296
3,400
B
84
Inspectors in public and environmental health and occupational health and safety
$32.86
$60,949
2,000
B
85
Construction inspectors
$36.00
$56,559
1,600
B
86
Petroleum, gas and chemical process operators
$33.00
$80,670
1,500
B
87
Paralegal and related occupations
$25.00
$48,480
1,400
B
88
Construction estimators
$31.25
$63,002
1,300
B
89
Financial auditors and accountants
$28.85
$52,687
13,500
A
90
Lawyers
N/A
$92,189
5,200
A
91
University professors and lecturers
$39.42
$78,403
4,800
A
92
Civil engineers
$35.00
$71,901
3,500
A
93
Business development officers, marketing researchers and counsultants
$25.00
$46,514
2,600
A
94
Electrical and electronics engineers
$40.00
$75,861
2,400
A
95
Mechanical engineers
$36.00
$69,677
2,400
A
96
Social policy researchers, consultants and program officers
$28.85
$51,109
1,500
A
97
Geoscientists and oceanographers
$34.62
$79,907
1,400
A
98
Post-secondary teaching and research assistants
$19.00
$10,247
1,400
A
99
Education policy researchers, consultants and program office
rs                       $30.22
$36,576
1,400
A
100
Biologists and related scientists
$33.65
$61,477
1,400
A
101
Architects
$31.73
$57,148
1,300
A
102
Employment counsellors
$23.00
$41,170
1,300
A
103
Web designers and developers
$21.63
$24,055
1,200
A
List of Top 100 Occupations in BC

My First Resume, My First Job.

myfirstJob_resume

Your résumé is one of the most important tools you have when looking for a job. This page will help you choose the right type of résumé for your situation. It will also provide you with tips to help you tailor your résumé to the job you’re applying for, and to make sure it stands out in a crowd for all the right reasons.

What is a résumé?

A résumé is a short, point-form document that you give to employers to tell them about your work experience, education, and skills. Before you write your résumé, you may want to complete a skills inventory to know what skills you have to offer an employer. http://www.youth.gc.ca/eng/media/skills_inventory.shtml

Types of résumés

Depending on your work experience, the job you’re applying for, or your personal preference, you may want to use a particular type of résumé. Here are three types of résumés to choose from:

A functional résumé focuses on your skills

If you haven’t had a lot of work experience, a functional résumé that focuses on your skills is a good way to market yourself to potential employers.

Instead of focusing on your previous work experience, a skills-focused résumé highlights the transferable skills you gained from previous jobs, activities, experiences, or volunteer work.

It’s most commonly used when you’ve had a large gap in your employment history, or if you have never worked before.

A chronological résumé focuses on your experience

Focusing on your work history is one of the more popular ways to structure a résumé. It shows employers all your work experience, focusing on positions you’ve held and your past responsibilities and accomplishments.

The chronological résumé is organized with your most recent information first. The goal is to give a comprehensive work history, organized by each job you’ve held. You give your position title, place of employment, how long you worked there, and a breakdown of your responsibilities or accomplishments.

This is a great multi-purpose résumé that works for most job applications, including retail.

A hybrid résumé is a combination of the two

A hybrid résumé is also known as a combination résumé. It combines the elements of a functional and chronological résumé to create a résumé that focuses heavily on skills, but also includes dates, titles of previous jobs, along with essential information about the position.

This is a good résumé to use when you want to prioritize your skills but also demonstrate how your career has evolved.

Important information to include in your résumé

There are a variety of different headings you can use in your résumé, depending on what type of résumé you choose to write.

However, regardless of the type of résumé you choose, here are three of the most important things it should include:

 

Your personal information

The first thing your employer should see when looking at your résumé is your name. Make sure it is clear, stands out, and is easy to read.

Your résumé should include your full address, contact phone numbers, and an e-mail address that incorporates your first and last name.

Things you should not include on your résumé:

  • your height, age, weight
  • a photo of yourself
  • your Social Insurance Number

Education

List your education, starting with the most recent, and work backwards from there. Include the name of the school, the city or town where each school you attended is located (secondary and beyond), and the years you completed.

Be sure to list any certificates or diplomas you received, including those for mini-courses like computer or software courses, first aid, or any other training that might be useful in the job you are applying for.

Skills and experience

Use your résumé to show where you worked, what you learned, and how your skills and experience apply to the job you’re applying for. Highlight abilities, skills, and experience that relate to the job you’re applying for. These can come from paid or unpaid work, volunteer experience, and even hobbies.

If all of your experience is in an unrelated field to the job you’re applying for, focus on the transferable skills you learned that can be applied to the new job you’re applying for.

When listing your work experience, include the location (city, province) and the dates you worked (month, year) for each job or volunteer position. Use action words to describe what you did in the positions you held. Focus on the top-five duties for each job.

Other relevant information

You may also want to include your job goals, the languages you speak, or any relevant achievements or awards. You can also include interests or activities that say something positive about you. Don’t forget, however, that the point of your résumé is to show why you are the right person for the job.

There are no official rules for what headings you should include on your résumé. Just remember to keep it concise, with the most important information at the top.

For example:

  • Let’s say you are applying for a job in software development and, although you have never worked in that field, you have a diploma in software engineering. In this case, be sure to put your education section at the top.
  • If you are applying to work in the food services industry and you have a lot of experience working in restaurants, be sure to list that information before your education details.

Top-10 résumé tips

  1. Think ahead. If you wait until the last minute to hand in your résumé, you could miss the deadline and risk not being considered for the job.
  2. Tailor your résumé. Include information on your résumé associated with the job you are applying for.
  3. Chunk it out. If there is a lot of information, break it into separate sections with specific headings.
  4. Use action words. Focus on things you have accomplished, and avoid starting every sentence with “I”.
  5. Proofread. Never rely on spell check.
  6. Repeat Tip 5. Seriously, even one misspelled word could put you in the “do not consider” pile. Have someone you trust also proof your document!
  7. Make it presentable. Make sure your résumé looks clean and organized. Use white, letter-sized paper (8.5 x 11-inch) and a font that’s easy to read, like Times New Roman or Arial.
  8. Keep it concise. Try to keep your résumé as short as possible—ideally one page, two pages maximum.
  9. Be honest. Lying on your résumé is never a good idea. Many people who lie on their applications end up losing their jobs when their employers find out the truth.
  1. Be professional.Remember, this is a business document, so don’t include unnecessary embellishments like flashy paper or a picture of yourself.

Skills inventory

Before you try to convince an employer that you’re the person they need to hire, you should identify all the skills you have to offer. It’s a lot harder to talk about your strengths if you don’t know what they are in the first place!

 

Find your transferable skills

Everything you learn and every skill you have is part of your personal tool kit. You carry these “tools” with you as you move through school and into the job market. When you develop a skill or gain experience in one place and put what you’ve learned to use someplace else, you’re using transferable skills.

Look through the following lists and check off every skill that you think you have.

Key skills

I can:

  • meet deadlines
  • supervise others
  • solve problems
  • teach others and give clear instructions
  • manage people
  • organize and manage projects
  • speak in public
  • accept responsibility
  • plan daily work or special events
  • follow instructions
  • generate creative solutions to problems

Hands-on skills

I can:

  • assemble kits
  • build or repair things
  • work well with my hands
  • operate tools or machinery
  • use complex equipment
  • drive or operate vehicles
  • inspect and maintain equipment or vehicles

 

 

Data/information skills

I can:

  • make a budget, manage money
  • record facts, classify information by date
  • analyze data, audit and maintain records
  • check information for accuracy
  • pay attention to details
  • investigate and clarify results
  • locate answers, gather information
  • calculate or compute
  • evaluate
  • take inventory
  • keep financial records
  • research and write reports

Leadership skills

I can:

  • arrange meetings or social functions
  • be competitive when necessary
  • make decisions
  • direct the work of others
  • help set goals for my team
  • explain things to others
  • solve problems
  • motivate people
  • settle disagreements
  • plan activities and put them into action
  • take risks when necessary
  • organize and chair a meeting
  • show self-confidence

 

 

People skills

I can:

  • help and care for others
  • manage conflicts, resolve issues
  • counsel people
  • be tactful and diplomatic
  • interview people
  • be kind and understanding
  • be a good listener
  • negotiate
  • be outgoing
  • show patience
  • be pleasant and sociable
  • supervise, teach
  • be tough when necessary
  • trust people
  • trust my instincts

Creative/artistic skills

I can:

  • be artistic
  • write short stories or articles
  • draw or create other art
  • express myself through music, poetry, or art
  • design posters, draw cartoons and illustrations
  • perform and act
  • present artistic ideas
  • dance, create body movement
  • use computers to create presentations
  • design and layout Web pages

 Verbal/communication skills

I can:

  • clearly express myself
  • talk easily with others
  • create and talk about new ideas
  • design presentations
  • be inventive
  • conduct research in a library or on the Internet
  • set up my own network of experts or helpers
  • be logical
  • speak in public
  • write clear and concise reports
  • work well with others

Find your hidden skills

You may have some valuable skills that you haven’t thought about including on your résumé. Follow these six steps to identify your hidden skills:

1) List all your previous and current experiences, at work and in other contexts.

When you think about your skills, don’t just consider paid work. You can also draw from extracurricular activities at school, time spent volunteering, and even hobbies.

2) Describe the tasks you completed using action words for each experience.

For example, suppose you worked in a coffee shop. You might describe the tasks you completed like this:

  • I followed recipes, mixed ingredients, set temperatures, baked muffins, and mixed a variety of hot and cold coffee and tea drinks.
  • I worked with complex equipment.
  • I operated a cash register, made change, and balanced the day’s receipts.
  • I worked with others under sometimes busy or stressful situations.

3) Identify the skill(s) required to complete those tasks.

Your list of skills might look something like this:

  • manual skills
  • computer skills
  • financial and number skills
  • teamwork and patience skills

4) List other things you learned to do in that job.

Other things you learned working in the coffee shop include how to:

  • manage your time responsibly and organize your work
  • serve customers in a professional and friendly way
  • display products so people will buy them

5) Identify the skills you gained from the other things you learned.

Your list of skills might look something like this:

  • time management skills
  • customer service and communication skills
  • marketing and promotional skills

6) Build strong sentences by combining the skills you developed with the tasks you completed.

  • I developed marketing and creative skills while designing window displays to attract customers.
  • I developed communication skills while serving customers and working with my co-workers.
  • I developed promotional skills while helping customers decide what to order.
  • I developed financial skills while making change, ordering inventory, and balancing the day’s receipts.

Find your job-related skills

Job-related skills are those that you need for a particular job. An office worker needs computer and keyboarding skills, a mechanic has to understand repairs and how to use tools, and a cashier must be able to make change and use a cash register. When you’re about to apply for a specific job, review your lists of skills and highlight the ones that are most relevant to the job you’re applying for. Once you have these elements, put them together into a résumé that will work for you.

What’s up at VIU Fall 2014


malLogoAs we prepare to run off to summer jobs or holidays, it’s a great time to set down some education and training plans for September!

This week we offer a peek at what is on offer at Vancouver Island University (VIU)’s Powell River Campus. As we are simply compiling and relaying this information, it’s best to check with VIU staff for any specifics and for updates at 604.485.2878 or check their website at http://www.pr.viu.ca/

Dual Credit

Some program seats are reserved for qualifying high school students which allows them to obtain their high school graduation while concurrently earning a Vancouver Island University Certificate or Vancouver Island University Credits.

The following programs/courses are available for Dual Credit:
Trades Programs

  • Automotive Service Technician – Foundation Level 1
  • Culinary Arts – Apprenticeship Level 1
  • Carpentry – Foundation Level 1
  • Hairdressing
  • Welding – Foundation

For more information please contact Jim Palm, Career Education Coordinator, Brooks Secondary School at 604-483-3171 or an advisor at Vancouver Island University at 604-485-2878.


Short-Term Certification Options

 VIU_OnCampusFall2014

English Academic Skills Experience (EASE)
Campus and Community English Immersion Program
Sustainable Leisure Management MA Program Preparation View brochure

Funding Opportunities

The following are links for Apprenticeship grants and tax credits

See http://www.itabc.ca/grants-tax-credits/grants. $1000 Apprenticeship Incentive Grants (AIGs) are available for first two years of Red Seal apprenticeships.

See list of AIG requirements here.

After that, tax credits are available. Tax credits are also available for non-Red-Seal apprenticeship programs.

A Career in Forest Firefighting

firefighting
Careers in : SILVICULTURE AND FORESTRY WORKERS (NOC 8422-C) and FORESTRY TECHNOLOGISTS AND TECHNICIANS (NOC 2223-B)

A forest fire can injure or kill animals, threaten towns and communities, emit pollutants into the air, and alter the soil and water. It can spread very quickly, and will destroy everything in its path. As a forest firefighter, it’s your job to minimize the damage that’s caused by a blaze like this one on the left by putting it out as quickly as possible. You also work to prevent fires from occurring in the first place, which involves removing fallen trees, managing controlled burning, and working to educate the community about fire prevention.

As a Forest Firefighter, the majority of your work is done outdoors as part of a crew. Many forest firefighters work where they live (and often where they grew up), protecting forests by putting out the fires that threaten their community. You are motivated and enjoy the challenge that every day brings. You are committed to your team, dedicated to physical fitness, endurance, diligence and the feeling of satisfaction knowing that you’re helping to protect the natural environment, people, and property.

The list includes typical job duties one might encounter as a forest fire fighter:

  • Use firefighting tools such as hoses, axes, and handheld radios
  • Operate and maintain skidders and bulldozers
  • Participate in water bombing operations
  • Dig trenches, cut trees, and pump water onto burning areas
  • Patrol burned areas to watch for hot spots that could restart fires
  • Prepare firefighting reports

Forest firefighters work in a variety of locations, including, but not limited to:

  • Carry heavy equipment across rough terrain
  • Handle large- or small-scale forest fires
  • Prepare firefighting reports

Before entering the workforce, forest firefighters are required to be trained in:

  • Chainsaw safety
  • Standard first aid
  • Transportation of dangerous goods
  • Workplace hazardous materials information systems (WHMIS)

Attributes & Abilitiesrelatedcareers

  • Communication skills
  • Work well as part of a team
  • Able to work in stressful situations
  • Physical strength and stamina
  • An interest in nature and the environment

You should have a strong interest in:

  • Physical education
  • Biology
  • Math
  • English

In most cases, the minimum educational requirement to work as a forest firefighter is a high school diploma. The following post-secondary programs are most applicable to a career in this field:

  • Forestry
  • Wilderness and survival
Location Wage ($/hr)
Low Median High
Vancouver Island and Coast Region 17.00 22.00 35.00
  •  Usually work 40 hours a week, which can include evening and weekend shifts
  • Wages
  • Starting wage 1st year in BC average $19-$20/hour

A few Post-Secondary Education Options

  • College of the Rockies fire training certificate
  • Location: Cranbrook Campus
  • Length: 22 Weeks
  • Tuition Levels (approx.): $13017 Total
  • Book & Supply Cost Estimates: $2500 Total
  • Credentials: Certificate
  • Confirm your program information with COTR
  • Application Deadline Advice: Applications from qualified students are processed on a first-come, first-served basis. Early application is recommended.
  • Application Fee: $30

____

  • BSF (Major in Forest Resources Management) Degree (UBC)
  • Location: Point Grey Campus – Vancouver BC
  • Length: Four Years
  • Tuition Levels (approx.): $5720 per year
  • Book & Supply Cost Estimates: $1170 per year
  • Credentials: Bachelor’s Degree
  • Confirm your program information with UBC
  • Application Deadline Advice: Applications must be submitted by January 31 for September entry. Early application is recommended. Confirm dates with UBC.
  • Application Fee: $62

___

  • Career Fire Fighter Pre-Employment Certificate
  • Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC)
  • Location: Maple Ridge
  • Length: 12 weeks (30 credits)
  • Tuition Levels (approx.): $7717 Total
  • Book & Supply Cost Estimates: $258 Total
  • Credentials: Certificate
  • Confirm your program information with JIBC
  • Application Deadline Advice: Visit www.jibc.ca for further information.
  • Application Fee: $75. Apply to JIBC now with the BC Post-Secondary Application Service.

Employment

“The best way for someone to qualify for an entry-level position is to enter a program in forest management at college and complete all the requirements to earn the degree.”

PROS 

  • Traveling to places that you would never otherwise see
  • Working with air operations on incident management teams, especially helicopters on fires, and getting to ‘play in the woods’ for a living
  • An opportunity to do something different every day
  • Thinking on your feet (e.g. determining whether you have a brush fire or if you’re going to a sandbagging call), you never know exactly what you have until you arrive on scene. You have to determine if you have a brush fire, if don’t know exactly the type of brush that you have, the topography, the weather, what the fire is exactly doing, or how long you are going to be working for
  • You get to stay physically fit and get to serve your community, which is admirable
  • You get to enjoy the camaraderie, working with other people and learning as well teaching them things

CONS

  • The work can be dangerous
  • Working with the forest service, sometimes we are working long hours, especially during prescribed burning season and fire season
  • Working on holidays; and when it’s a beautiful sunny day, it’s a possible fire day. While everyone else is at the beach, a ranger is sitting at home waiting on a fire
  • Being on call for fires means you have to stay close to home or close to your truck
  • Being away from your family/friends for long stretches of time, whether it’s days or weeks
  • Discomfort: sometimes sleeping out on mountainsides on rocks, on the dirt, and getting dirty for long periods of time.
  • Work outdoors in all kinds of weather
  • The work is noisy, dusty, and physically demanding

 

 

 

Bladerunners is back!

Bladerunners20LogoWhat is Bladerunners?
Bladerunners is one of the most successful youth employment programs in BC. It helps participants with multiple barriers to employment to successfully transition into the workplace. By providing essential certifications and personal guidance, Bladerunners helps to ensure participants have what it takes to get hired.
This session of Bladerunners is geared towards preparing participants for jobs in the service industry. Eligible youth who wish to become employed this summer are strongly encouraged to apply.

What will Bladerunners receive?
● 4 weeks of classroom-based learning focusing on professional development, skills enhancement, and personal growth.
● WHMIS, Food Safe, World Host, Serving it Right, First Aid (OFA L1) and other workshops and training.
● Possibility of other certifications or necessary pieces of identification as needed.
● Training stipend of $100/week for attendance.
● Employment bonus of $100 upon attaining employment.
● Work clothes to help support the cost of entering the workplace.
● Possibility of participating in additional work experience.
Who is Eligible?
Unemployed or underemployed youth ages 15-30 who are not students and have not received Employment Insurance in the past 3 years are eligible for Bladerunners.
Good candidates for Bladerunners include youth with some of the following barriers and criteria:

  • Lack of experience or education (eg. Non-completion of High School, limited work experience or training)
  • At risk factors (eg. History of substance abuse, single parent issues, contact with justice,
  • homeless or at risk of homelessness)
  • Aboriginal ancestry

Details
● The program runs for 4 weeks, Monday June 16th to Friday July 11th
● Sessions will be held at Career Link #103, 4511 Marine Avenue, Powell River V8A 2K5
● To discuss becoming a Bladerunner, please contact Nicole Townsend at nicole@careerlinkbc.com or call Career Link at 604 485-7958.

Seaspan set to hire new tradespeople by Fall 2014

Seaspan
Seaspan

There couldn’t be a better time to pursue a career in BC’s burgeoning shipbuilding sector. Annual revenues in the BC shipbuilding and repair industry are projected to climb from an average of $265 million (2004-2010) to more than $1.4 billion by 2018, according to BCShippingNews

At least 2,000 new direct jobs and 2,500 indirect jobs are expected to be created by 2020.

Seaspan Marine is gearing up for a significant increase in trades positions. The exciting news came in 2011, when Seaspan Vancouver Shipyards was selected to build four noncombat ships for Canada: offshore fishery science vessel, offshore oceanographic science vessel, joint support ship, and polar ice breaker. In 2013, the government announced two additional Seaspan projects: offshore patrol vessels (OPVs) and medium endurance multi-task vessels (MEMTVs).

“Since the 2011 announcement we have been working with the government on the design for the fishery science vessel and investing in our facilities in North Vancouver and Victoria, building new facilities, buying equipment, putting in place new processes and building the team,” says John Shaw, VP Government Relations and Business Development at Seaspan.

Shaw says Seaspan has hired all senior management and technical staff. The company is currently hiring engineers and production managers—“those people that have experience in building ships”—and in eight months will begin filling trades positions.

“We will be completing the design for the fishery vessel this year and are looking at starting construction in the fourth quarter. We’ll have the first uptake in trades work in October,” Shaw says. “Over the year, we expect, with the building of the offshore fishery science vessel, that our production workforce would grow to between 250 and 350 people.”

That means hiring about 50 to 100 new tradespeople in the last quarter of 2014.

Production of the joint support ship is expected to start in late 2016. “And for that, we would see a ramp-up in the production workforce in late 2016 and into 2017 of up to 1,000 tradespeople.”

Shipbuilding trades include the following:

  • Electrician
  • Joiner
  • Machinist
  • Metal Fabrication
  • Painter
  • Sheet Metal
  • Steamfitter
  • Welder

All trades positions are filled through the respective unions. Anyone interested in becoming qualified to fill a trades position should contact the union for information and requirements.

Here are some links to Trade Unions to get you started:

  • Marine & Shipbuilders Local 506 – representing Painters/Sandblasters, Welders, Shipfitters, Metal Fabricators, Crane Operators , Riggers, Joiners and General Labour. http://marineandshipbuilderslocal506.ca/
  • International Association of Machinists Lodge 692 – representing Mechanics (Engine Fitters), Machinists http://www.ibew213.org/
  • United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters, Local 170 – representing Pipefitters http://www.uacanada.ca/
  • International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers – IBEW Local 213 representing Electricians http://www.ibew213.org/
  • Marine Workers & Boilermakers Industrial Union – Local 1 representing Welders, Shipfitters, Painters/Sandblasters, General Labour http://www.marineworkers.ca

High-school students who are interested in trade certification will need to enter an apprenticeship program and should contact the union for information. Some trades require completion of a certificate program before becoming an apprentice. For example, Steamfitters have to complete the Pipefitter Foundations Certificate at an accredited learning institution prior to the apprenticeship. Apprenticeships are generally four or five years, depending on the trade.

Shaw says it is also possible to do an apprenticeship through Seaspan. “It’s something we are currently doing, but the volume will pick up as we move into 2015 and 2016.”

He notes that Seaspan apprentices still have to go through the unions for hiring. “We can train tradespeople, but they then go on to the union seniority list and then we hire through the unions.”

For information on apprenticeships, click here: http://www.seaspan.com/career-path-apprenticeship/

Shaw has this advice for high-school students thinking about a trades career: “First, talk to your high-school counsellor. The high-school counsellor should have information on trades training and the process necessary to do that.”

Here are some links to help you get started on your career

Accredited Learning Institutions provide the classroom courses and training segment of apprenticeship programs. See what’s involved in the classroom side of apprenticeship by following the links to the trade for program schedules, course outline, hours and schedules. Enrolment is subject to acceptance into an apprentice program.